Welcome!


Top Stories

Join IBM November 1 at 21st Cloud Expo at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA, and learn how IBM Watson can bring cognitive services and AI to intelligent, unmanned systems. Build a Cognitive Chatbot Powered by IBM Watson 3:40 pm – 4:15 pm JeanCarl Bisson, Developer Advocate, IBM In this session we will build a chatbot powered by IBM Watson, connect it to third-party APIs, and share best practices of chatbots co-existing with humans. Bringing Life to Intelligent, Manned Systems with AI and IBM Watson 4:20 pm – 4:55 pm Marek Sadowski, Developer Advocate, IBM Cognitive analysis impacts today's systems with unparalleled ability that were previously available only to manned, back-end operations. Thanks to cloud processing, IBM Watson can bring cognitive services and AI to intelligent, unmanned systems. Imagine a robot vacuum that becomes your personal as... (more)

11th Cloud Expo: A–Z of Big Data & Cloud Computing Topics

What's "Cloud 2.0"? Who's behind "SHadoop"? Why is the Cloud so important to the Big Data boom? Are you turning your data into dollars? Which cloud model is right for your company? Register to attend 11th Cloud Expo | Cloud Expo Silicon Valley and get your questions answered November 5–8. Here's what you can look forward to, expressed numerically: 1 Convenient Venue – Santa Clara Convention Center, Santa Clara, CA 2 Interlocking Themes – Cloud Computing & Big Data 4 Content-Packed Days – November 5–8, 2012 6 Industry Keynotes 8 Distinct Parallel Tracks 174 Breakout Technical & Strategy Sessions 203 Expert Speakers & Panelists 90,000 Square Feet of Expo Floor and 1 Not-To-Be-Missed Opening Night Welcome Reception on Nov 5 ! The event is co-located with 2nd International BigDataExpo. Registration includes both events. Whether you are a large enterprise, a growing busines... (more)

Top #M2M Brand: @ThingsExpo | #IoT #IIoT #AI #ML #DL #DX #SmartCities

\\ @GonzalezCarmen has been ranked the Number One Influencer and @ThingsExpo has been named the Number One Brand in the "M2M 2016: Top 100 Influencers and Brands" by Onalytica. Onalytica analyzed tweets over the last 6 months mentioning the keywords M2M OR "Machine to Machine." They then identified the top 100 most influential brands and individuals leading the discussion on Twitter. Machine to Machine (M2M) refers to direct communication between devices using any communications channel, including wired and wireless. The M2M market is undergoing a fast transformation as enterprises are increasingly realizing the value of connecting geographically dispersed people, devices, sensors and machines to corporate networks. Today, industries such as healthcare, automotive, oil and gas, precision agriculture, military, government, smart cities/municipalities, manufacturing... (more)

So You Want a Stand-alone Database for Java

When you see the words Java database application, you probably start thinking about enterprise-level solutions with multitier architectures and distributed deployment. But Java is a great general-purpose, object-oriented language and thus a good choice for developing smaller scale, stand-alone database aplications as well. You can enjoy the benefits of programming in Java regardless of an application's scale or deployment. I define a stand-alone database application as one that is installed and maintained primarily by the end user. Deployment may be on an isolated computer or small network for shared database access. Examples of stand-alone database applications are numerous in shareware, consumer software and general-purpose business programs. When it comes to finding a stand-alone database solution for Java, there's good news and bad news. The good news is that sol... (more)

Methods, Constructors, Overloading and Access Levels

Methods tell us what a class can do.Developers can define their own methods and Java Developers Kit has a variety of classes and each of them may contain methods. Some methods require arguments - the incoming data that have to be processed. For example, here is the code to convert a String value to a number of the type of integer: String testStr = "5000"; int test = Integer.parseInt(testStr); It is said that the method parseInt() has one argument of type String. The method parseInt() is defined in the Java class Integer. Programmers could also define methods that take arguments, for example: double calcTax(double grossIncome, String state, int dependents){ // The code implementing business logic goes here } Arguments are used in the method body the same way as if they were declared as local variables, but their values will be provided by the caller of the method, for... (more)

From Sun, An Open Letter to Eclipse Membership: "Get Serious"

An Open Letter to Eclipse Membership January 30, 2004 Sun would like to congratulate the Eclipse organization on the eve of the transition to independence. This move proves again that the Java technology ecosystem is capable of spawning new value and continued technical diversity. Given this noteworthy accomplishment, and the recent creation of javatools.org, Sun would like to reflect on what we hope the future has in store for Java technology-based tools and the enduring Java platform. What we have in common: the Big Picture. First and foremost, the main goal for all of us in the Java development community is to achieve the strongest possible technology and market position for the Java platform. The Big Picture is a Java technology solution that ensures no "lock in" to a given platform, one that generates competitive markets and technologies, and one based on standard... (more)

Looking Back at Java: "Java's Great Missed Opportunity"

On March 8, 2004, Java Developer's Journal published the following profile of Dr Adam Kolowa (pictured). Successful enterprises and successful business leaders often have two characteristics in common: focus and simplicity. In Adam Kolawa's case - CEO, chairman, and a cofounder of Parasoft 15 years ago - the simplicity manifests itself the moment you meet him. Here is a chief executive who knows how to prioritize. Priority number one, as far as Kolawa is concerned, has always been verification. The alpha and omega of the Parasoft approach is that software cannot be said to work until it is verified - this includes Web services. "This is something that I learned long ago," Kolawa explains, "and it's a major problem within the software industry. Companies build and develop software, hope that it works, but do not go to the necessary lengths to verify that the software... (more)

i-Technology Viewpoint: "Java is Back!"

Related Links: Exclusive .NETDJ Interview with Don Box - The King of COM "Is Carly Toast Yet?" - Maureen O'Gara on HP's Fiorina, Three Years On The best things come in threes, they say. So this month's threefold boost for Java suggests that, in a nutshell, Java is back. The three items involve an IT commentator, an industry executive, and a recent development within the software industry itself. After a couple of years off the radar screen of the general public, the language that began as Oak (developed as part of the so-called "Green Project" at Sun started in December 1990 by Patrick Naughton, Mike Sheridan, and James Gosling) and then, as Java, burst onto the technology world in May 1995, is suddenly back on the tip of everyone's tongue. Before the inevitable complaints ("But it never went anywhere!") start, let's remember that everything is relative. A "Googlefigh... (more)

"Today is Googleday!" - Internet Sector Comes Back to Life

Having asked the Securities and Exchange Commission to declare its IPO effective as of 4:00 PM. Eastern time today, Google should be worth about $110 per share on its fiirst day of trading tomorrow, experts predict. Google Inc.had net income of $143 million on sales of $1.35 billion in the first half of 2004. Trading on the Nasdaq stock market under the symbol "GOOG" is expected to be vigorous, and futures contracts traded on the Web yesterday lead experts to predict a 59% chance that the shares will advance once trading starts. Google began accepting bids on Friday for the 25.7 million shares of Class A common stock it is making available through its unusual electronic "Dutch auction." Depending on the final price (the range set is $108-135 for each share) Google's market value will tshortly emerge as being only just below that of rival Yahoo Inc. Amazingly, for a co... (more)

The i-Technology Right Stuff

Related Links: Wanted: 19 More of the Top Software People in the World Sung and Unsung i-Technology Heroes Who's Missing from SYS-CON's i-Technology Top Twenty?" Our search for the Twenty Top Software People in the World is nearing completion. In the SYS-CON tradition of empowering readers, we are leaving the final "cut" to you, so here are the top 40 nominations in alphabetical order. Our aim this time round is to whittle this 40 down to our final twenty, not (yet) to arrange those twenty in any order of preference. All you need to do to vote is to go to the Further Details page of any nominee you'd like to see end up in the top half of the poll when we close voting on Christmas Eve, December 24, and cast your vote or votes. To access the Further Details of each nominee just click on their name. Happy voting!   In alphabetical order the nominees are:   Tim Berner... (more)

i-Technology's All-Time Top 100?

Gene Amdahl: Implementer in the 60s of a milestone in computer technology: the concept of compatibility between systems Marc Andreessen: Pioneer of Mosaic, the first browser to navigate the WWW; co-founder of Netscape John Vincent Atanasoff: Inventor of an electronic computer in the late 1930s not for fun or glory, but because he had problems for it to solve Charles Babbage: Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at Cambridge in 1828; inventor of the 'calculating machine' John Backus: Inventor (with IBM) of FORTRAN (FORmula TRANslator) in 1956 Ralph Baer: "The man who invented video games" (Pong) Kent Beck: Creator of JUnit and pioneer of eXtreme Programming (XP) Bob Bemer: One of the developers of COBOL and the ASCII naming standard for IBM (1960s) Tim Berners-Lee: "Father of the World Wide Web" and expectant father of the Semantic Web D J Bernstein: Author of qmail Jos... (more)

CloudEXPO Stories
More and more companies are looking to microservices as an architectural pattern for breaking apart applications into more manageable pieces so that agile teams can deliver new features quicker and more effectively. What this pattern has done more than anything to date is spark organizational transformations, setting the foundation for future application development. In practice, however, there are a number of considerations to make that go beyond simply “build, ship, and run,” which changes how developers and operators work together to streamline cohesive systems.
@DevOpsSummit at Cloud Expo, taking place November 12-13 in New York City, NY, is co-located with 22nd international CloudEXPO | first international DXWorldEXPO and will feature technical sessions from a rock star conference faculty and the leading industry players in the world. The widespread success of cloud computing is driving the DevOps revolution in enterprise IT. Now as never before, development teams must communicate and collaborate in a dynamic, 24/7/365 environment. There is no time to wait for long development cycles that produce software that is obsolete at launch. DevOps may be disruptive, but it is essential.
CloudEXPO New York 2018, colocated with DXWorldEXPO New York 2018 will be held November 11-13, 2018, in New York City and will bring together Cloud Computing, FinTech and Blockchain, Digital Transformation, Big Data, Internet of Things, DevOps, AI, Machine Learning and WebRTC to one location.
The Internet of Things will challenge the status quo of how IT and development organizations operate. Or will it? Certainly the fog layer of IoT requires special insights about data ontology, security and transactional integrity. But the developmental challenges are the same: People, Process and Platform and how we integrate our thinking to solve complicated problems. In his session at 19th Cloud Expo, Craig Sproule, CEO of Metavine, demonstrated how to move beyond today's coding paradigm and share the must-have mindsets for removing complexity from the development process, accelerate application delivery times, and ensure that developers will become heroes (not bottlenecks) in the IoT revolution.