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Vol: 8 Iss: 1

Read Back Issues

If you ever questioned the usefulness or power of blogs, let me remove any remaining doubt you may have with this story. I have my own blog, http://alan.blog-city.com, and I use it primarily as a public scratchboard, noting thoughts and various observations regarding our industry throu...
For Java developers, as for all professionals, the beginning of a new year is a good time to review what new directions the technology world is moving in, what changes in the job environment those new directions will bring with them, and what changes you may need to make, as a Java dev...
Java developers will have noticed in the past few weeks that Sun has already begun to crank up a new 'unified' approach to its software business. Sun gave JDJ an exclusive chance to ask questions, offering you the reader the opportunity to ask Jonathan Schwartz, the dynamic young execu...
Although developing full-featured desktop applications with Java has become a manageable task and performance has improved greatly, developers still face obstacles that make it difficult to get their Java applications more widely accepted. One problem with many Java standalone applicat...
J2ME developers have long desired the opportunity to build sophisticated applications for the personal digital assistant (PDA) market, applications common to resource-rich desktop computers. One thing stood in their way: most PDAs lacked resources to efficiently execute those applicati...
The Java Community Process (http://jcp.org) defines the way Java standards are created. Through this process, members of the community are invited to work together in expert groups (EG) to create new Java specifications. If you wanted to create a new specification, you would f...
Along with many others, I've believed for quite some time now that there must be a change in the custodianship of Java for the platform to survive these uncertain times. My personal belief is that any future custodian of the Java platform must be an organization of community members (b...
It's been over two years since I wrote my last article about using the Java runtime on Linux ('Java Technology on the Linux Platform' [JDJ, Vol. 5, issue 12]). The Java platform and Linux distributions have not stood still during that time, so I'm taking this opportunity to answer some...
Java on OS X is a first class citizen. You can integrate your app so well that users probably won't even know they're using a Java application. You can package your apps so they have one of those lovely 128x128 icons. You can package your apps so they have one of those lovely 1...
There's a saying - 'Life is about choices' - that can also be applied to Linux. In the mainstream there are about 60 different vendors with a Linux distribution working on a number of hardware platforms. For the enthusiasts that's okay, as they can reinstall as often as they like. A bu...
Java servlet technology provides developers with functionality, scalability, and portability that can't be found in other server-side languages. One feature of the Java servlet specification that's commonly used, and sometimes misused, is the HttpSession interface. This simple interfac...
Sure, there's a JVM for Linux and applets will run in any Linux browser, but can you actually code from a Linux box? When the GNU/Linux boom hit in the late '90s, all the hype was directed at the server. How Linux would save enterprises great gobs of cash in storage. How stable it was ...
A colleague of mine is an easy target for anything that's free. I'm not talking about free from the perspective of 'unshackled' or 'independent.' Rather, I'm talking about the type of free that won't make his wallet thinner. To him anything that looks, tastes, or smells 'free' is the m...
Who would have guessed that this duo - Java and Linux - would revitalize the development community and help customers make the move to an open, standards-based approach to computing? The momentum surrounding Java and Linux is undeniable. In just a few short years, both have gr...
Back in high school, I worked as a roadie for my friends' rock and roll band. It was a great job, since I didn't need to make much money. Good thing, that. My take from our fabulous two-week, Christmas '74, 'Wyoming Tour' was $9.