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Vol: 4 Iss: 1

Read Back Issues

Welcome to 1999. This is typically the time I make predictions about the coming year. Next year I'll get this issue out and have a good laugh at all the things I missed - and the few I actually get right. I'd be remiss in my editorial duty if I didn't make some predictions.
Every year, Java Developer's Journal presents two types of awards – the JDJ Editor's Choice Awards and the JDJ Readers' Choice Awards. These awards are designed to honor and recognize the leaders in the Java world – specifically, those companies and products that the editor a...
Hypertext is wonderful. It allows the Webmaster to link from any page to millions of other computers all over the world. Unfortunately, the Web pages you find will only have the links that were placed by the Webmasters. What if you want more information about a word or a phrase on a pa...
It's true that you don't need a computer degree to know how to program. However, to do it with the kind of quality that allows for easy maintenance and change is another matter. As we all know, based on Software Engineering (SE) principles, a software product's life cycle consists of a...
JDJ:Welcome to SYS-CON Radio's live broadcast from the Java Business Expo. Joining us is Ethan Henry, Java evangelist for KL Group. Thanks for coming today. Henry: Thanks, Chad.
Last month's issue (JDJ, Vol. 3, Issue 12) covered the basic concepts of programming with Java's I/O streams, such as the difference between byte and character streams, the various stream classes, the concept of stream chaining and more. We'll conclude the subject this month by lookin...
In the November JDJ (Vol. 3, Issue 11) we peered into the Cosmic Cup to look at some of the Java Virtual Machines on the market. We also discussed how a VM enables Java to promote its "write once, run anywhere" (WORA) cause. To recapitulate, the Java programming environment m...
I recently had the opportunity to work with the NetBeans Developer IDE 2.0 for Java. Although the marketplace seems to be flooded with application development environments for Java programming, the team at NetBeans is offering a slightly different approach toward Java development. Whil...
As Java takes a leap toward the next generation of enterprise computing, enterprises get ready to deploy large-scale business applications using Java. This article describes how the new Enterprise Java-Beans (EJB) technology from Sun Microsystems can be instrumental in building distrib...
This article describes our use of design patterns to create an interpreter in Java, and shows how it can be built in a "pure," object-oriented fashion. .The patterns we use are from Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software by Gamma, Helm, Johnson and Vli...
HALT! Just stop right there! You've probably stumbled across this column while merrily thumbing through this magazine, and you're now wondering what this lump of words is all about. You may have noticed this column in previous issues but couldn't be bothered to read it. After all, who'...
When you write user interfaces, you inevitably have to collect information from text fields and validate the data before you use it. There are several ways of handling validation. You can verify the text as the user exits the field by watching for lost focus events, or you can wait for...
This is the first in a two-part series on Event management in large distributed applications built on top of Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB). This installment will cover the architecture and the implementation of a local (single VM) version of the event distribution system. The second artic...
In the final months of 1998 it was worth reflecting on the networked application platform and its star player, Java, as we headed into the new year. Many of you have written and put forward your own assessment of the Java movement as it rode into 1999, representing the fourth year of J...