Welcome!


Vol. 10 Iss: 8

Read Back Issues

Three times in recent years I've joined an organization that was relatively new to Java development and missing some basic infrastructure elements that I'd relied on in previous development efforts. These elements include utility classes, standards and conventions, and build and qualit...
The JavaOne Conference was the stage for many Java premiers and launches. One of them was the Star Spec Leads program initiated by the JCP.
Magic, like software, depends on understanding the audience. Why not use a few techniques from magic to understand users?
Experienced developers know many of the benefits of and motivations for using interface-based design principles. Interfaces provide for polymorphic behavior by hiding the implementation and only exposing the relevant public methods of the implementing class. What may be less appreciate...
This article presents a Java/Swing component implementation of a feature that is ubiquitous in nearly all desktop applications, particularly Windows applications - an area in the lower right portion of a window (Frame) that can be used to resize the window.
Java has been the springboard for some of the most successful open source projects today including JBoss, NetBeans, and Eclipse. Several folks though have felt the missing piece was an actual open source implementation of the runtime. Some view Sun's stewardship of Java and the JCP as ...
Over the past few years, the Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB) specification has evolved significantly. In the early days of EJB, application developers faced a burden of overwhelming complexity: they had to manage several component interfaces, deployment descriptors, and unnecessary callback...
Aspect-Oriented Programming (AOP) is a new, thought-provoking architecture paradigm still in its youth. One of AOP's primary goals is to improve the development of object-oriented systems by refactoring related lines of code that are typically found spread among classes (and are theref...
This rather pedagogically worded article is a collection of my thoughts on debugging Java software, the programming patterns I have used, some useful APIs, and techniques.
Over the past 12 months, I have observed significant benefits using the Unified Modeling Language (UML) when developing Rich Internet Applications using Macromedia's Flash Platform and JRun (Java application server).
Today's enterprise applications are distributed by design. For applications to interact with one another over networks optimally, they require Service Oriented and Event Driven Architectures made up of loosely federated business resources, that interact by exchanging requests (for data...
'Java on mobile phones' has been the hottest topic at the JavaOne conference for the past several years. This year was no exception and a large part of the show floor was designated as the 'Wireless Village.' With tens of billions dollars' worth of Java phones and related services sold...
Aspect-Oriented Programming (AOP) is undeniably one of the coolest things to happen in the software technology in a long time. AOP has been called the 'third dimension of programming' (copyright by Frank Sauer, Technical Resource Connection, Inc.) and has tremendous power in dynamical...
Despite the increasingly widespread adoption of J2EE for enterprise applications, measuring their performance in production continues to be a black art. Without knowing what to look for, many people measure anything that seems useful, which soon results in an overloaded system and ream...
At JavaOne this year, one of the biggest announcements (albeit this one had nothing really to do with Java) was the acquisition of SeeBeyond by Sun Microsystems. It looks like Sun is putting its cash, which it has plenty of, to good use. As we have seen over the last decade of Java, Su...
All the myriad commentators who monitor Internet technologies and the i-Technology companies on the NASDAQ doubtless have their own private cluster of indicators that they use to take a weather-check on the overall state of the industry. For some, it's as simple as looking at the NASDA...