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Vol: 7 Iss: 5

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The whole wireless space has been an interesting one to keep an eye on for the past couple of years, in particular how it relates to the Java space. Sure, we've heard wonderful tales about the vast millions of phones in Japan and how quickly Java is being adopted there, but for the res...
With the next generation of wireless devices entering the market, the opportunities for Java developers are great. Analysts are predicting that the demand for wireless applications is set to explode, with over 170 million U.S. users subscribing to wireless services by 2005. Other count...
In Part 1 of this article (JDJ, Vol. 7, issue 3) I introduced the idea of using the surrogate architecture within Jini as a platform for J2ME games. I also showed how to start Madison, Sun's reference implementation, and how to connect to it with the provided device simulator.
Making good software is hard enough, as most software developers can testify. There is, however, one aspect of software that is invariably even harder than we expect: How do we get the software into the target environment?
Here's a quiz: consider a physician accessing different patients' histories on a PDA while making rounds at a Manhattan hospital versus a field engineer whose responsibility is to monitor and repair sections of an oil pipeline that stretch across 200 miles in Texas.
Although I've been following EJB 2.0 very closely, it was only recently that I walked into a project that was the perfect venue for its new features, such as the much enhanced container-managed persistence and local interfaces. And Enterprise JavaBeans, written by Richard Monson-Haefel...
It's unfortunate that programmers come and go at an alarming rate in the IT industry, leaving code that must be maintained by someone who quite frequently had no hand in writing it. Software engineers using UML have models on how their programs behave, but the rest of us are left to re...
Releasing Java applications can be a real challenge. Fortunately, Java provides a rich set of features for packaging and deploying applications that can simplify the release process significantly.
This month we focus on women in the engineering world. In this competitive, male-dominated world, female engineers face a variety of challenges. Many of these challenges have less to do with getting the job done than with getting hired, communicating with their male counterparts, and g...
JavaOne is over, and it's time to sit back and reflect...and to sift through the hundreds of press releases and announcements that ricochet around the Internet like balls around a pinball machine. While I couldn't be there myself, when I checked my e-mails each day, I felt as if I was...
There was no ticker tape parade to accompany the release of the JDBC 3.0 specification, but many will be pleasantly surprised at its list of enhancements that include everything from performance-tuning options to support for extended-level database features.
I'll never buy a Casio watch again. Not just because they break down - that's just the luck of the draw - but because of their extremely poor service. I've spent months trying to get my $200 watch back from their service center, but to no avail. It isn't the money that matters; it's th...
EJB 2.0 is the latest release of the Enterprise JavaBean specification. The major releases of the EJB specification have been 1.0, 1.1, and 2.0. EJB 2.0 adds several crucial features to version 1.1, including message-driven beans, local interfaces, an enhanced container-managed persist...
The Java 2 Platform, Enterprise Edition (J2EE), is the platform of choice for implementing scalable and reliable enterprise applications from reusable components. But Java developers building enterprise-class J2EE applications face a quandary.
Whether you're a developer writing code, a manager guiding a project, or a customer giving requirements, you're familiar with the steps needed to successfully create a business application. Often referred to as the application-development life cycle, these steps typically involve gathe...
Sun's seventh annual JavaOne conference was held March 25-28 at the Moscone Center in downtown San Francisco. This was the sixth Java conference I attended and it was interesting to compare it with the previous shows.
If you read my editorial last month (JDJ, Vol. 7, issue 4), you'll recall that I was trying to work out just who the Java community was and whether or not you or I feel a part of it. Well, I think I met the community at JavaOne 2002.
Computers can perform many operations a lot faster than humans. However, there are many tasks in which the computer falls considerably short. One such task is the interpretation of graphic information. A preschool child can easily tell the difference between a cat and a dog, but this s...
With J2SE Version 1.4, Java finally has a scalable I/O API. Not that the old API was an absolute failure (Java's tremendous success in the application server market refutes this), but some of the old API's properties led to drastic restrictions. The worst one was the blocking I/O.
As I'm pathologically fond of pointing out - I'm a child of a bygone era. Oh, I'm not old enough to remember the time before Sputnik, light bulbs, or the coagulation of the planets from protostellar dust clouds, but I surely do remember GI Joe at 45 caliber, Ray Stevens at 45 RPM, and ...