Welcome!

Java IoT Authors: Liz McMillan, Jason Bloomberg, Zakia Bouachraoui, Elizabeth White, Yeshim Deniz

Related Topics: Java IoT, Microservices Expo

Java IoT: Article

Seven Things You Need to Know About Development Project Estimations

You cannot escape from the fact that project estimation is essential to its success

Whether you are a project manager planning for a smooth implementation of a plan or a project sponsor on whose decisions a project depends, you cannot escape from the fact that project estimation is essential to its success. In the first place, there are three basic requirements that a project must satisfy: schedule, budget, and quality. The need to work within these essential project boundaries poses a huge challenge to everyone in the central management team.

There are various aspects that affect project estimates, such as team skills and experience levels, available technology, use of full-time or part-time resources, project quality management, risks, iteration, development environment, requirements, and most of all, the level of commitment of all project members.

Moreover, project estimations do not need to be too complicated. There are tools, methodologies, and best practices that can help project management teams, from sponsors to project managers, agree on estimates and push development efforts forward. Some of these include the following:

  1. Project estimates must be based on the application’s architecture. Making estimates based on an application’s architecture should give you a clear idea of the length of the entire development project phase. Moreover, an architecture-based estimation provides you a macro-level view of the resources needed to complete the project.
  2. Project estimations should also come from the ground up. All estimates must add up, and estimating the collective efforts of the production teams that work on the application’s modules helps identify the number of in-house and outsourced consultants that you need to hire for the entire project, as well as have a clear idea of the collective man-hours required to code modules or finish all features of the application. Ground-up estimates are provided by project team members and do not necessarily match top-level estimates exactly. In this case, it is best to add a percentage of architecture-based estimates to give room to possible reworks, risks, and other events that may or may not be within the control of the project staff.
  3. Do not forget modular estimates. Once you have a clear idea of the architecture, it becomes easier to identify the modules that make up the entirety of the application. Knowing the nature of these modules should help you identify which can be done in-house or onshore, or by an offshore development team. Moreover, given the location and team composition of each development team that works on a module, it becomes easier to identify the technical and financial resources needed to work on the codes.
  4. Development language matters. Whether the development language is Java, .Net, C++ or any other popular language used by software engineers, team that will be hired for the project must be knowledgeable in it. Some development efforts require higher skills in these languages, while some only need basic functional knowledge, and the levels of specialization in any of these languages have corresponding rates. Most of the time, the chosen development language depends on the chosen platform, and certain platforms run on specialized hardware.
  5. You cannot promise upper management dramatic costs from offshoring. While there are greater savings from having development work done by offshore teams composed of workers whose rates are significantly lower from onshore staff, you must consider communication, knowledge transfer, technical set-up, and software installation costs in your financial estimates. Estimating costs is often more about managing expectations, but as the project matures, it should be clearer whether the money spent on it was money that was spent well.
  6. Project estimation software and tools help identify “what-if” scenarios. Over the years, project managers have devised ways to automate project schedule, framework, cost, and staffing estimates. Some estimation applications also have sample historical data or models based on real-world examples. If your business has a lot in common with the samples in the estimation tool, it can help you identify what-if scenarios and in turn include risks, buffers, and iteration estimates.
  7. Price break-down helps in prioritization. Breaking down the total cost of the project helps management decide which parts of a system should be prioritized, delayed, or even cancel. Estimating costs for a new project may not be easy, but project sponsors and managers must be able to know and agree on the breakdown of costs of development, technical requirements, and overhead.

By ExecutiveBrief Staff

ExecutiveBrief is an online resource on project management, process management and project leadership. For more information please visit http://www.executivebrief.com/.

More Stories By Executive Brief

ExecutiveBrief is an online project management resource for technology executives, featuring expert opinions, reviews, blogs and news. The publication mostly covers software project management and process improvement topics and is targeted at higher decision-makers. Other focus topics of ExecutiveBrief are leadership issues and outsourcing industry trends. More information at: www.executivebrief.com

IoT & Smart Cities Stories
Here are the Top 20 Twitter Influencers of the month as determined by the Kcore algorithm, in a range of current topics of interest from #IoT to #DeepLearning. To run a real-time search of a given term in our website and see the current top influencers, click on the topic name. Among the top 20 IoT influencers, ThingsEXPO ranked #14 and CloudEXPO ranked #17.
The Jevons Paradox suggests that when technological advances increase efficiency of a resource, it results in an overall increase in consumption. Writing on the increased use of coal as a result of technological improvements, 19th-century economist William Stanley Jevons found that these improvements led to the development of new ways to utilize coal. In his session at 19th Cloud Expo, Mark Thiele, Chief Strategy Officer for Apcera, compared the Jevons Paradox to modern-day enterprise IT, examin...
According to Forrester Research, every business will become either a digital predator or digital prey by 2020. To avoid demise, organizations must rapidly create new sources of value in their end-to-end customer experiences. True digital predators also must break down information and process silos and extend digital transformation initiatives to empower employees with the digital resources needed to win, serve, and retain customers.
In his keynote at 18th Cloud Expo, Andrew Keys, Co-Founder of ConsenSys Enterprise, provided an overview of the evolution of the Internet and the Database and the future of their combination – the Blockchain. Andrew Keys is Co-Founder of ConsenSys Enterprise. He comes to ConsenSys Enterprise with capital markets, technology and entrepreneurial experience. Previously, he worked for UBS investment bank in equities analysis. Later, he was responsible for the creation and distribution of life settl...
Contextual Analytics of various threat data provides a deeper understanding of a given threat and enables identification of unknown threat vectors. In his session at @ThingsExpo, David Dufour, Head of Security Architecture, IoT, Webroot, Inc., discussed how through the use of Big Data analytics and deep data correlation across different threat types, it is possible to gain a better understanding of where, how and to what level of danger a malicious actor poses to an organization, and to determin...
@CloudEXPO and @ExpoDX, two of the most influential technology events in the world, have hosted hundreds of sponsors and exhibitors since our launch 10 years ago. @CloudEXPO and @ExpoDX New York and Silicon Valley provide a full year of face-to-face marketing opportunities for your company. Each sponsorship and exhibit package comes with pre and post-show marketing programs. By sponsoring and exhibiting in New York and Silicon Valley, you reach a full complement of decision makers and buyers in ...
There are many examples of disruption in consumer space – Uber disrupting the cab industry, Airbnb disrupting the hospitality industry and so on; but have you wondered who is disrupting support and operations? AISERA helps make businesses and customers successful by offering consumer-like user experience for support and operations. We have built the world’s first AI-driven IT / HR / Cloud / Customer Support and Operations solution.
LogRocket helps product teams develop better experiences for users by recording videos of user sessions with logs and network data. It identifies UX problems and reveals the root cause of every bug. LogRocket presents impactful errors on a website, and how to reproduce it. With LogRocket, users can replay problems.
Data Theorem is a leading provider of modern application security. Its core mission is to analyze and secure any modern application anytime, anywhere. The Data Theorem Analyzer Engine continuously scans APIs and mobile applications in search of security flaws and data privacy gaps. Data Theorem products help organizations build safer applications that maximize data security and brand protection. The company has detected more than 300 million application eavesdropping incidents and currently secu...
Rafay enables developers to automate the distribution, operations, cross-region scaling and lifecycle management of containerized microservices across public and private clouds, and service provider networks. Rafay's platform is built around foundational elements that together deliver an optimal abstraction layer across disparate infrastructure, making it easy for developers to scale and operate applications across any number of locations or regions. Consumed as a service, Rafay's platform elimi...