Click here to close now.


Java IoT Authors: Liz McMillan, SmartBear Blog, Gary Kaiser, Elizabeth White, Chris Fleck

Related Topics: @CloudExpo, Java IoT, Microservices Expo, Linux Containers, Cloud Security, @BigDataExpo

@CloudExpo: Article

Integrate Cloud-Based Disaster Recovery into Business Continuity Strategy

DRaaS will continue to gain market strength as a solution this year while evolving to better meet customer requirements

Cloud-based Recovery-as-a-Service (RaaS) is becoming big business. Research and Markets forecasts the global market of RaaS and cloud-based business continuity will reach $5.77 billion by 2018, creating major opportunities for business continuity and risk management specialists alike. Likewise, Reportstack announced recently the global Disaster Recovery-as-a Service (DRaaS) market is expected to grow at a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 54.64 percent from 2014 to 2018.[1]

One of the leading drivers for small and mid-size businesses (SMBs) as well as enterprises seeking cloud solutions is Disaster Recovery (DR).[2]Organizations seek improved resiliency and failover in response to service disruptions of all kinds including natural disasters, cyber-attacks and technical malfunctions. In 2013, the financial impact of natural disasters worldwide was more than double the $100 billion estimate of 1990.[3]McAfee® Labs Threats Report indicates service disruptions are inevitable and becoming more predictable, with a reported 20 million new types of malware in the third quarter of 2013 alone. In a recent survey, IDC found that 71 percent of respondents experienced less than 10 hours of annual downtime, with a projected financial impact for SMBs of $125,000. Larger enterprise organizations could potentially have a corresponding annual financial impact of $17 million.[4] Dun & Bradstreet surveyed Fortune 500 companies with 59% of respondents reporting 1.5 hours of downtime each week, amounting to a projected $46 million impact annually for companies of 10,000 employees or more.[5]

However, the impact may be even greater. In a 2013 Ponemon Institute study, 91 percent of the participants reported that their organizations experienced unplanned downtime in the past two years. When you consider it takes about two days to recover from an IT event, if at all, the cost can be much higher in terms of lost revenue and damage to a company's reputation through reduced customer loyalty.

Floods, mudslides, ice and snow storms, hurricanes, tornados and cyclones, fires and droughts have one thing in common: all can have a negative financial impact on day-to-day business. Hurricane Sandy ranked as the largest global disaster in 2012 with a price tag of $65 billion. At the same time, New Jersey residents and municipalities had to cover an additional $8 million to $13 million in unmet expenses. Businesses are still trying to recover from the hurricane, with many resorting to bankruptcy protection. In 2013, 296 adverse weather events, predominantly in Europe and Asia, caused $192 billion in worldwide economic losses. Although the dollar amount was 4 percent less than the 10-year average, the number of events was greater than the 10-year average of 259.[6]

Other factors generating a need for Disaster Recovery planning include the risk potential from cyber attacks on Wi-Fi access into secure networks, Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks, resistant malware, insider threats, attacks on employee-owned device, or bring your own device (BYOD), and breakdowns with out-of-date, legacy systems.

Banks have been particularly hard hit in the last couple of years by DDoS attacks, prompting an April 2014 notice from the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council (FFIEC), which requires banks to assess risk, monitor, and develop response plans to mitigate against DDoS attacks.[7] Attacks are becoming more sophisticated and can shut down business activity, slow website connections or prevent access to institutional websites. These attacks can be system-wide or come in via peripherals. For instance, an unsecured keyboard video mouse (KVM) switch allows cyber attackers to capture keystrokes and password information or access information through unauthorized universal serial bus (USB) devices and microphones.[8]

Cybercriminals are becoming stealthy and developing tools and botnet source codes that are increasingly complex and capable of avoiding detection. Cryptolocker, for instance, can be delivered by e-mail and is added to the start-up menu. It encrypts the data, infects the system and locks the organization out. Criminals then demand a ransom to unlock the data.[9]

Today, 31 percent of PCs continue to run on Windows XP operating systems. It's not just PCs that are at risk, as a number of medical devices and point of sale (POS) systems use Windows to run transactions, and the systems are not consistently updated. In April 2014, Microsoft announced it would no longer provide support and updates, placing systems and equipment at increased risk for cyber attacks. Because enterprise and institutions invest so much time and money in legacy hardware and software, these systems will require expert knowledge moving forward to maintain system security.

Business Continuity Planning is No Longer Optional
All of these factors point to the need for systematic security planning. Business Continuity Management (BCM) refers to the plans executed and activities performed on a daily basis to maintain business consistency and ensure critical business systems will be available when disaster strikes. And although the term Business Continuity Management is used interchangeably with DR, it is considered to be a separate, overarching strategic plan which includes disaster recovery, crisis management, incident response and contingency planning, as well as business impact analysis, recovery time objective (RTO) and recovery point objective (RPO).

BCM is a set of processes and practices created to identify and mitigate threats and their potential impact while providing the framework to prevent, mitigate and recover from disruptions of all kinds including the implementation of new programs, processes, system virtualization and other process shifts. And, although closely related, DR is more about the process of building continuity capabilities for infrastructure and applications. More specifically, DR is the business' ability to maintain critical operations and provide services during a disruptive event.[10]

Disaster recovery and business continuity continue to rank as two of today's top business concerns due to the prevalence of natural and man-made disruptions. A recent Continuity Insights and KPMG Continuity Management Program Benchmarking study was conducted to determine whether enterprise organizations are prepared for a disruptive event. The study involved 434 executives from 22 countries. Approximately 71 percent of those surveyed indicated a senior management board had been established for the purpose of developing a BCM, which made a big difference when conducting business impact analyses (BIAs), recovery objectives, adopting global standards and addressing cyber security issues. However, 36 percent of the respondents indicated they did not address cyber terrorism issues in the BCM. More than half of those surveyed stated they were prompted to initiate a BCM plan, DR plan or crisis management plan due to a disruption. Outages were due to weather problems, power interruptions and IT security issues and represented a nine percent increase in disruptions over the previous year's responses.[11]

Zero Tolerance for Downtime
New technologies and business trends such as virtualization and mobile device BYOD policies, cloud computing, real-time data analysis, e-commerce, third-party cloud-based providers, and globalization are prompting more companies to establish DR and BCM plans as part of overall business strategies. These trends make 24x7 availability the number one priority. At the same time, enterprise organizations are seeking fast Internet speeds, real-time information and ubiquitous connectivity to remain competitive, which leaves no room for downtime.

So, what is the cost if a business continuity plan is not instituted? Plenty, according to leading analysts. In a published study by Touche Ross and ioSafe, companies without a DR plan have a survival rate of less than 10 percent. Gartner, a leading information technology research company, breaks it down even further, predicting 25 percent of PCs will fail this year, while mid-sized companies will experience about 20 hours of network, system and application downtime at an average cost of $70,000 an hour. Forrester, another leading research company, predicts that 24 percent of companies will have a full data disaster.[12]

Business Continuity Planning is Key
In its annual business continuity trends study, Continuity Central reports some interesting findings in the way survey respondents are handling business continuity this year. More than half of those surveyed expect to make small changes to existing BCM plans in 2014, while a quarter of the respondents are expecting bigger changes, and eight percent anticipate a more thoroughly integrated plan. Five percent will implement ISO 22301 projects this year. As the first international standard developed for BCM, the ISO 22301 specifies what requirements businesses must meet to ensure the business recovers from a disaster or disruptive event.

Secure Data with Cloud Computing
Now that cloud computing has matured as a platform, more companies are beginning to trust that moving critical data to the cloud will ensure against loss in the event of a disaster or event. Forbes predicts that overall cloud spending will grow by about 25% this year, reaching $100 billion for software and services as well as cloud infrastructure. More SMBs will join the cloud at a growth rate of 20 percent over the next five years and more mid-sized companies will move to public clouds.[13]

More companies are seeking ways to reduce the cost of DR, which represents about 25 percent of the overall IT budget, without sacrificing security. However, as network architecture gains complexity, data recovery from on-site storage is becoming a long and arduous process, and on-site backup and restore has increased risk associated with it due to its potential for failure. The cost becomes even greater when organizations put time, effort and money into additional architecture to mirror all servers, applications, data, software and network connections. To that point, CIOs realize cloud storage poses less of a risk while the recovery process makes sound financial sense. Cost avoidance is gained as enterprise no longer needs to make large capital investments and infrastructure upgrades to maintain availability.

Cloud Service Providers (CSPs) offer a range of storage options and as-a-service offerings, which makes DRaaS a faster and more simplified process. Likewise, virtualized servers have brought down the cost of cloud storage, making it easier for SMBs to compete on the same level as larger organizations.

DRaaS Provides a Low Cost Solution
DRaaS is a flexible platform, enabling enterprise organizations to choose whether it's necessary to restore the entire organizational infrastructure or just critical applications. Organizations gain more control because they get to decide how data should be saved and what critical infrastructure needs to be restored and in what order. A recent study by the Aberdeen Group reports DRaaS is growing as the preferred solution because it reduces the risk of losing critical business data and experiencing a business interruption; critical applications can be up and running in minutes, not days; and it's a faster way of bringing the business back to normal.

Benefits of DRaaS as a pay-as-you-go recovery model are lower costs and minimized downtime as applications are automatically restarted once the problem is identified. Because DRaaS is on a virtual platform rather than on an on-site server, business continuity requirements to meet performance standards and consistency can also be achieved. A virtual backup site provides much needed data replication while providing faster recovery time at a lower cost because it runs on higher capacity, shared architecture. Testing can occur more frequently, because the system is always ready and does not have to be placed offline to test.[14]

Creating a Business Continuity Plan
A greater number of businesses today are taking advantage of cost-effective, pay-as-you-go DRaaS and BCM plans. BCM takes into account the scope of requirements for backup and restoration of data, applications, systems and in some cases, facilities, to ensure business continuity when disaster strikes. The first step when developing DRaaS or BCM is finding the right cloud service provider to help your organization determine solution architecture to meet your recovery performance needs and requirements; this can be done by performing a business impact analysis with a qualified professional. Once complete, a feasibility plan is needed to ensure proper procedures are implemented and followed. Results must then be measured by testing the system repeatedly for availability, completeness and verified backup. The plan should then be shared with key personnel so everyone knows their roles and responsibilities when downtime occurs.

The Future of DRaaS and BCM
DRaaS will continue to gain market strength as a solution this year while evolving to better meet customer requirements. The service is expected to become faster while efficiently optimizing infrastructure storage and servers. Virtualization will be key to meeting customer service level agreements while addressing recovery point and recovery time objectives. Platform flexibility will be integrated with self-service for larger companies with internal IT staff. Expect more companies to ask for a hybrid combination of DR strategies combining on-premise backup solutions with cloud platforms for data archiving and recovery. This way, on-site and cloud applications can be synched for rapid recovery.

Some customers will seek multiple CSPs for different cloud services, opening up new opportunities for vendors and risk management specialists. Storage is expected to double in growth in 10 years, while IT staff remains in demand. CSPs and risk management specialists who can serve as trusted IT advisors will be better positioned to take advantage of opportunities from companies seeking purpose-built back-up solutions. While at the same time, CSPs who enact simple, consumer-oriented pricing strategies will make decision-making easier for enterprise and speed up the sales cycle for solution specialists and channel partners. Last but not least, giving the customers what they want, true customer support, can make the difference in building a larger customer base and improving customer loyalty.[15]

More Stories By Mike Castañeda

Mike Castañeda is the Director of Technology at Lam Cloud Management, a New Jersey-based provider of proven Business Continuity, Workplace Recovery, Data Center and Network solution.

Comments (0)

Share your thoughts on this story.

Add your comment
You must be signed in to add a comment. Sign-in | Register

In accordance with our Comment Policy, we encourage comments that are on topic, relevant and to-the-point. We will remove comments that include profanity, personal attacks, racial slurs, threats of violence, or other inappropriate material that violates our Terms and Conditions, and will block users who make repeated violations. We ask all readers to expect diversity of opinion and to treat one another with dignity and respect.

@ThingsExpo Stories
WebRTC has had a real tough three or four years, and so have those working with it. Only a few short years ago, the development world were excited about WebRTC and proclaiming how awesome it was. You might have played with the technology a couple of years ago, only to find the extra infrastructure requirements were painful to implement and poorly documented. This probably left a bitter taste in your mouth, especially when things went wrong.
Nowadays, a large number of sensors and devices are connected to the network. Leading-edge IoT technologies integrate various types of sensor data to create a new value for several business decision scenarios. The transparent cloud is a model of a new IoT emergence service platform. Many service providers store and access various types of sensor data in order to create and find out new business values by integrating such data.
The broad selection of hardware, the rapid evolution of operating systems and the time-to-market for mobile apps has been so rapid that new challenges for developers and engineers arise every day. Security, testing, hosting, and other metrics have to be considered through the process. In his session at Big Data Expo, Walter Maguire, Chief Field Technologist, HP Big Data Group, at Hewlett-Packard, will discuss the challenges faced by developers and a composite Big Data applications builder, focusing on how to help solve the problems that developers are continuously battling.
There are so many tools and techniques for data analytics that even for a data scientist the choices, possible systems, and even the types of data can be daunting. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Chris Harrold, Global CTO for Big Data Solutions for EMC Corporation, will show how to perform a simple, but meaningful analysis of social sentiment data using freely available tools that take only minutes to download and install. Participants will get the download information, scripts, and complete end-to-end walkthrough of the analysis from start to finish. Participants will also be given the pract...
WebRTC: together these advances have created a perfect storm of technologies that are disrupting and transforming classic communications models and ecosystems. In his session at WebRTC Summit, Cary Bran, VP of Innovation and New Ventures at Plantronics and PLT Labs, will provide an overview of this technological shift, including associated business and consumer communications impacts, and opportunities it may enable, complement or entirely transform.
SYS-CON Events announced today that Dyn, the worldwide leader in Internet Performance, will exhibit at SYS-CON's 17th International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on November 3-5, 2015, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. Dyn is a cloud-based Internet Performance company. Dyn helps companies monitor, control, and optimize online infrastructure for an exceptional end-user experience. Through a world-class network and unrivaled, objective intelligence into Internet conditions, Dyn ensures traffic gets delivered faster, safer, and more reliably than ever.
WebRTC services have already permeated corporate communications in the form of videoconferencing solutions. However, WebRTC has the potential of going beyond and catalyzing a new class of services providing more than calls with capabilities such as mass-scale real-time media broadcasting, enriched and augmented video, person-to-machine and machine-to-machine communications. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Luis Lopez, CEO of Kurento, will introduce the technologies required for implementing these ideas and some early experiments performed in the Kurento open source software community in areas ...
Too often with compelling new technologies market participants become overly enamored with that attractiveness of the technology and neglect underlying business drivers. This tendency, what some call the “newest shiny object syndrome,” is understandable given that virtually all of us are heavily engaged in technology. But it is also mistaken. Without concrete business cases driving its deployment, IoT, like many other technologies before it, will fade into obscurity.
Today air travel is a minefield of delays, hassles and customer disappointment. Airlines struggle to revitalize the experience. GE and M2Mi will demonstrate practical examples of how IoT solutions are helping airlines bring back personalization, reduce trip time and improve reliability. In their session at @ThingsExpo, Shyam Varan Nath, Principal Architect with GE, and Dr. Sarah Cooper, M2Mi's VP Business Development and Engineering, will explore the IoT cloud-based platform technologies driving this change including privacy controls, data transparency and integration of real time context w...
Who are you? How do you introduce yourself? Do you use a name, or do you greet a friend by the last four digits of his social security number? Assuming you don’t, why are we content to associate our identity with 10 random digits assigned by our phone company? Identity is an issue that affects everyone, but as individuals we don’t spend a lot of time thinking about it. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Ben Klang, Founder & President of Mojo Lingo, will discuss the impact of technology on identity. Should we federate, or not? How should identity be secured? Who owns the identity? How is identity ...
The IoT market is on track to hit $7.1 trillion in 2020. The reality is that only a handful of companies are ready for this massive demand. There are a lot of barriers, paint points, traps, and hidden roadblocks. How can we deal with these issues and challenges? The paradigm has changed. Old-style ad-hoc trial-and-error ways will certainly lead you to the dead end. What is mandatory is an overarching and adaptive approach to effectively handle the rapid changes and exponential growth.
The buzz continues for cloud, data analytics and the Internet of Things (IoT) and their collective impact across all industries. But a new conversation is emerging - how do companies use industry disruption and technology enablers to lead in markets undergoing change, uncertainty and ambiguity? Organizations of all sizes need to evolve and transform, often under massive pressure, as industry lines blur and merge and traditional business models are assaulted and turned upside down. In this new data-driven world, marketplaces reign supreme while interoperability, APIs and applications deliver un...
Electric power utilities face relentless pressure on their financial performance, and reducing distribution grid losses is one of the last untapped opportunities to meet their business goals. Combining IoT-enabled sensors and cloud-based data analytics, utilities now are able to find, quantify and reduce losses faster – and with a smaller IT footprint. Solutions exist using Internet-enabled sensors deployed temporarily at strategic locations within the distribution grid to measure actual line loads.
The Internet of Everything is re-shaping technology trends–moving away from “request/response” architecture to an “always-on” Streaming Web where data is in constant motion and secure, reliable communication is an absolute necessity. As more and more THINGS go online, the challenges that developers will need to address will only increase exponentially. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Todd Greene, Founder & CEO of PubNub, will explore the current state of IoT connectivity and review key trends and technology requirements that will drive the Internet of Things from hype to reality.
The Internet of Things (IoT) is growing rapidly by extending current technologies, products and networks. By 2020, Cisco estimates there will be 50 billion connected devices. Gartner has forecast revenues of over $300 billion, just to IoT suppliers. Now is the time to figure out how you’ll make money – not just create innovative products. With hundreds of new products and companies jumping into the IoT fray every month, there’s no shortage of innovation. Despite this, McKinsey/VisionMobile data shows "less than 10 percent of IoT developers are making enough to support a reasonably sized team....
You have your devices and your data, but what about the rest of your Internet of Things story? Two popular classes of technologies that nicely handle the Big Data analytics for Internet of Things are Apache Hadoop and NoSQL. Hadoop is designed for parallelizing analytical work across many servers and is ideal for the massive data volumes you create with IoT devices. NoSQL databases such as Apache HBase are ideal for storing and retrieving IoT data as “time series data.”
Today’s connected world is moving from devices towards things, what this means is that by using increasingly low cost sensors embedded in devices we can create many new use cases. These span across use cases in cities, vehicles, home, offices, factories, retail environments, worksites, health, logistics, and health. These use cases rely on ubiquitous connectivity and generate massive amounts of data at scale. These technologies enable new business opportunities, ways to optimize and automate, along with new ways to engage with users.
The IoT is upon us, but today’s databases, built on 30-year-old math, require multiple platforms to create a single solution. Data demands of the IoT require Big Data systems that can handle ingest, transactions and analytics concurrently adapting to varied situations as they occur, with speed at scale. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Chad Jones, chief strategy officer at Deep Information Sciences, will look differently at IoT data so enterprises can fully leverage their IoT potential. He’ll share tips on how to speed up business initiatives, harness Big Data and remain one step ahead by apply...
There will be 20 billion IoT devices connected to the Internet soon. What if we could control these devices with our voice, mind, or gestures? What if we could teach these devices how to talk to each other? What if these devices could learn how to interact with us (and each other) to make our lives better? What if Jarvis was real? How can I gain these super powers? In his session at 17th Cloud Expo, Chris Matthieu, co-founder and CTO of Octoblu, will show you!
As a company adopts a DevOps approach to software development, what are key things that both the Dev and Ops side of the business must keep in mind to ensure effective continuous delivery? In his session at DevOps Summit, Mark Hydar, Head of DevOps, Ericsson TV Platforms, will share best practices and provide helpful tips for Ops teams to adopt an open line of communication with the development side of the house to ensure success between the two sides.