Click here to close now.

Welcome!

Java Authors: Pat Romanski, Elizabeth White, Carmen Gonzalez, Liz McMillan, Yeshim Deniz

Related Topics: Microservices Journal, Java, AJAX & REA, Web 2.0

Microservices Journal: Article

SOA World Expo: Enterprise Mashup Services

Part 1: Real-World SOA or Web 2.0 Novelties?

Since Web 2.0 kicked off scarcely a day goes by without a headline targeting mashups and their enablers, AJAX and Web Services, as the next hot Web technologies. Mashups are Web sites that integrate a variety of services (e.g., news feeds, weather reports, maps, and traffic conditions) in new and interesting ways. Just take a look at Zillow.com, which provides instant home valuations plotted as thumbtacks on a map (Figure 1), or HousingMaps.com, which marks listings from craigslist.org as captions on a map, and you'll get a clear picture of the power behind converging data sources.

Google Maps is often identified as the disruptive force that spawned the mashups movement. The popular mapping service is now the home of more than 600 mashups according to ProgrammableWeb.com. Why the hype? Google Maps provides a simple JavaScript API that makes geo-spatial data, a historically cost-prohibitive service, easily accessible to a broad audience with a variety of technical skills. Web 2.0-savvy developers are highly attracted to this simplified and accessible approach to SOA development because it no longer confines their Web site functionally to a user interface, but opens the site up to syndicate functionality and data. Thus a site's success is no longer based on traffic alone, but on the number of subscribers. The proliferation of these services is mind-boggling. ProgrammableWeb.com, a mashup-tracking site, has more than 300 registered services available to mix-and-match, and more than 1,100 registered mashups. Roughly 2.8 new sites are registered every day.

Despite the momentum behind mashups, corporate IT departments only consume a handful of the services used by the mashup crowd. Instead, businesses have constructed their own ecosystem of services in parallel to the Web 2.0 movement. The problem with corporate adoption of mashups is two-fold. First, the concept of mashups is often considered a social phenomenon or a grassroots effort tangential to enterprise software. Second, there's no clear path to integrate business services with those available on the Web. This second issue is due, in part, to the impedance mismatch between business services and mashup services. Mashup APIs are generally written in JavaScript, while services deployed to the enterprise are developed using Java or .NET technologies. Thus, both perception and technology define the barriers to corporations adopting an enterprise mashup strategy that incorporates external services such as Google Maps.

Despite these initial hurdles, the services and collaborative development style that mashups provide have created a buzz among enterprise software vendors. IBM recently announced a R&D effort to create an enterprise "mashup maker" - a tool that lets developers blend corporate services with external services, and rapidly assemble applications. More recently, Oracle announced the Oracle WebCenter Suite, which uses JSR-168/286 and WSRP 1.0/2.0 to mix-and-match corporate services using a combination of AJAX and Java portlets. The "mashup maker" and "mashups as a portal" are both interesting concepts and quite possibly the future of rapid business application development. In a later installment we will take a closer look at JSR-168/286 and WSRP 1.0/2.0 and how these standards can be used to create enterprise mashups that mix corporate services. Meanwhile, the aim of this article is to give application developers, specifically enterprise Java developers, the tools to build meaningful enterprise mashups that take advantage of the popular mashup services.

Today's Toolkit
Business services developed with Java technologies generally fall into one of four categories: Enterprise JavaBeans, Spring, POJOs, or Web Services. The problem is that mashup APIs are generally implemented with JavaScript. There are a few services such as Flickr that offer parallel APIs written in Java, .NET, and a number of other technologies. For sites that don't offer a Java API, developers are left to their own devices to bridge the integration gap between JavaScript and Java. Existing Web Services provide the most direct path to integration, and processing XML over XMLHttpRequests, though tedious, is a relatively established method of binding AJAX-enabled interfaces to Web Services. There are a number of JavaScript packages, such as the vcXMLRPC Library, that help simplify the handling of XML-RPC requests. However, integrating Java-centric applications built with Spring or Enterprise JavaBeans makes for a more interesting problem. The first solution that comes to mind is to expose an existing EJB or Spring application as a Web Service, a simple task given that both EJB 3.0 and Spring 2.0 support remote method invocations via a Web Service end-point (JSR 181). Despite the simplicity of creating such a Web Service, we are still presented with the cumbersome task of processing XML with JavaScript.

Java-to-AJAX libraries such as Direct Web Remoting (DWR) and JSON-RPC-Java offer a simple alternative by marshaling Java objects to JavaScript and letting JavaScript communicate directly with server-side Java objects (Figure 2). So developers can interact with Java objects as if they were client-side JavaScript objects, negating the need to work with XML. For instance, by using a Java-to-AJAX library we can expose operations performed by a session bean to an AJAX-enabled Web interface and then combine the outcomes of those operations with a mashup service. An added benefit of the servlet architecture used by DWR and JSON-RPC-Java is that both libraries can take advantage of the authentication and session management provided by Java EE 5. Despite the similarities shared by both DWR and JSON-RPC-Java, DWR has a few advantages, two of which are the ability to handle recursive object structures and its integration with a large number of other libraries and frameworks such as Spring, Struts, JSF, Rife, WebWorks, and Hibernate. Thus, the amalgamation of DWR, enterprise Java services, and JavaScript mashup APIs blends the flexibility and creativity behind Web 2.0 with the reliability, scalability, and security of the Java EE architecture without needing to manipulate XML documents.

Building an Enterprise Mashup
The example application referenced in this article uses the Java Persistence API (JPA), Google Maps, and DWR to create a simple customer address book application (Figure 3). The application plots customers by address on a map using Google Map's JavaScript API. Users can update an entry by selecting a marker on a map and editing associated values in a form. Changes are committed by clicking the update, remove, and create. All records are stored in an Oracle database and persisted using the JPA.

The application provides a simple end-to-end example that demonstrates one method of blending external mashup services with Java-centric business services. Note that this article does not provide an in-depth look at DWR, JPA, or Google Maps. Instead, the intention is to prove the simplicity of integration between these technologies and enable you, the reader, to build your own enterprise mashups that leverage popular JavaScript APIs like Google Maps. Please refer to the references included in this article for more information on DWR, JPA, and Google Maps.

Setting up the DWR servlet is simple and can easily be added to an existing application. To install the servlet, first put the DWR jar in the lib directory under the WEB-INF directory, and add the following lines to the web.xml descriptor:

<servlet>
   <display-name>DWR Servlet</display-name>
   <servlet-name>dwr-invoker</servlet-name>
   <servlet-class>uk.ltd.getahead.dwr.DWRServlet
   </servlet-class>
   <init-param>
     <param-name>debug</param-name>
     <param-value>true</param-value>
     </init-param>
  </servlet>
  <servlet-mapping>
     <servlet-name>dwr-invoker</servlet-name>
     <url-pattern>/dwr/*</url-pattern>
</servlet-mapping>

Next, DWR must be made aware of the Java objects that should be remotable as JavaScript interfaces. The Customers object is the single JPA entity used in the application and maps to a Customers table (Listing 1). A session façade named JavaServiceFacade is used to encapsulate operations on the Customers entity object (Listing 2). Both the JavaServiceFacade and Customers classes must be registered with DWR to interact with each object via JavaScript. To do so, simply create a dwr.xml file in the WEB-INF directory as follows:

<dwr>
   <allow>
   <create creator="new" javascript="JavaServiceFacade">
   <param name="class" value="com...JavaServiceFacade"/>
     <include method="queryCustomersFindAll"/>
     <include method="queryCustomersFindById"/>
     <include method="mergeCustomers"/>
     <include method="persistCustomers"/>
     <include method="removeCustomers"/>
   </create>
   <convert converter="bean" match="com...Customers"/>
    </allow>
</dwr>

The dwr.xml descriptor defines a subset of methods on the JavaServiceFacade object to expose and declares a JavaBean converter to marshal the Customers entity as a return value or method parameter. In this example, two query methods as well as the merge, persist, and remove operations contained in the JavaServiceFacade are exposed. Once the dwr.xml file is created, three JavaScript files must be imported in the JSP or HTML pages contained in the application. This enables the use of the JavaScript representation or remote interfaces of the JavaServiceFacade and Customers Java objects. The imports are as follows:

<script type='text/javascript'
src='../dwr/interface/JavaServiceFacade.js'></script>
<script type='text/javascript' src='../dwr/engine.js'></script>
<script type='text/javascript' src='../dwr/util.js'></script>

Note that only the JavaScript interface for the JavaServiceFacade is imported because it's the sole object that contains methods that are invoked explicitly. With the web.xml file configured, the dwr.xml file created, and all the necessary JavaScript files imported, the methods contained in the JavaServiceFacade are now accessible from a Web browser via JavaScript. To test the installation, open a Web browser and navigate to http://localhost:[port]/[nameofwebapp]/dwr. A screen should appear resembling that shown in Figure 4. Figure 5 shows all of the methods on the JavaServiceFacade that are accessible remotely.

The next step is to integrate the JavaScript interface for the JavaServiceFacade with the Google Maps API. To use the Google Maps API, an activation key is required. Visit www.google.com/apis/maps/signup.html to obtain a key. Keys are mapped to a unique URL so the key included in this article will only work with the source code provided. To use a key different from the one included in this example, simply add the following import statement to the top of your JSP page, replacing the key contained in the URL with the one obtained from the Google Maps registration page. The import below is required in the JSP page irrespective of the activation key used.

<script src="http://maps.google.com/maps?file=api&v=2&key=value"
type="text/javascript"></script>

With both DWR and Google Maps configured, DWR calls to the JPA façade and the Google Maps API can be integrated. A simple load function and a div tag, in this case named "map," are used to initialize the mapping UI. The load function is assigned to the onload attribute of the body tag in the HTML or JSP page. Note that if you're using Dojo you must use the frameworks dojo.addOnLoad function instead of the onload attribute. The load function used in the example application not only initializes the Google Maps API, but also calls the queryCustomersFindAll function defined in the JavaServiceFacade JavaScript interface to retrieve all the Customers objects. The JavaServiceFacade.queryCustomersFindAll function accepts a reference to another function as an argument. The argument handles the return value of the JavaServiceFacade.queryCustomersFindAll function as an asynchronous callback. In this case the callback handler is the processCustomers function, which processes the list of Customers returned by the JavaServiceFacade.queryCustomersFindAll function, plotting each Customers object on the map as a marker (Figure 6).

// Called on intial page load
function load() {
   if(GBrowserIsCompatible()){
     // Remotely call Java method
     // to extract all Customers
     JavaServiceFacade.queryCustomersFindAll(processCustomers);
     // Initalize map object
     map = new GMap2(document.getElementById("map"));
     // Add navigation controls to map
     map.addControl(new GSmallMapControl());
     map.addControl(new GMapTypeControl());
     // Initalize geocoder
     geocoder = new GClientGeocoder();
   }
}

// Plots an array of Customers on
var processCustomers =
   function(customers){
   // test if array is null
   if(customers != null &&
     typeof customers == 'object'){
     // iterator over array of customers
     for(var i=0;i < customers.length; i++){
       // plot each customer on the map
       addMarkerForCustomer( customers[i] );
       }
   } else {
     alert("Customer record is null!");
   }
   // Set map center and magnification
   map.setCenter(
     new GLatLng(37.4419, -122.1419), 9);
}

Plotting markers with Google Maps requires three simple steps. First, a geo-spatial point on the map is obtained by using the Google geocoder API. Second, a GMarker object representing the geo-spatial is created. Finally, the marker is added to the map at the given point by calling the addOverlay function on the current instance of the GMap2 object - the object that represents the map displayed in the UI. Below is the function used to plot a Customers object as a marker. In the example a geo-spatial point is generated with the address information provided by the Customers object. A helper function is used to create a new GMarker, which is then added to the map object with a call to the addOverlay function.

// Plots a customer on the map as a marker
function addMarkerForCustomer(customer){
...
   // create address string
   var address = customer.address + ...;
   // create point using geocoder
   geocoder.getLatLng(
     address,
     function(point) {
     ...
     // create marker
     var marker = createMarker(point, customer);
     // overlay marker on map
     map.addOverlay(marker);
     }
   );
...
}


More Stories By Ric Smith

Ric Smith is director, business and product strategy at Kaazing. provides Kaazing Corporation with a wealth of experience in product management and consulting for enterprise products and services. Prior to joining Kaazing, Ric was a principal product manager for Oracle's Fusion Middleware at Oracle's Headquarters in Redwood Shores, CA. In his role as a Principal Product Manager he was responsible for the evangelism and product direction of Oracle's AJAX and Java EE Web Tier offerings. Before joining the Fusion Middleware team, Ric worked for Oracle's consulting business as a principal consultant where he led development of mission-critical applications for prominent organizations within the defense/intelligence industry. In addition, Ric won consecutive awards for technical achievement for each year of his tenure as a consultant. Ric is a frequent speaker at international events and has written articles featured in leading industry publications such as Java Developer's Journal and AJAXWorld Magazine. He is also a representative to the OpenAjax Alliance and an honors graduate of the University of Arizona.

Comments (3) View Comments

Share your thoughts on this story.

Add your comment
You must be signed in to add a comment. Sign-in | Register

In accordance with our Comment Policy, we encourage comments that are on topic, relevant and to-the-point. We will remove comments that include profanity, personal attacks, racial slurs, threats of violence, or other inappropriate material that violates our Terms and Conditions, and will block users who make repeated violations. We ask all readers to expect diversity of opinion and to treat one another with dignity and respect.


Most Recent Comments
EdwinVDS 10/31/08 06:25:43 AM EDT

I have started a poll on the subject of Enterprise Mashups here : http://www.micropoll.com/akira/TakeSurvey?id=1086551

S&S Media 02/01/07 06:11:27 AM EST

Webinale 07 - A Conference For the Next Generation Web
The Web is in motion! It's about conversations, interpersonal networking, personalization, and individualism. The need for immediacy, interactivity, and community, combined with new and light-weight technologies are changing the social structure of the Web. The Next Generation Web is about getting associated with openness, trust, authenticity and collaboration. Interactivity, new possibilities to connect, social software, usability, and community networking are fast catching up with users. This new buzz is generating fresh and exciting projects. The latest buzzword is Web 2.0, and the event for anyone seeking to stay on top of this buzz is Webinale 2.0!
More info at www.webinale.com

SOA News Desk 01/22/07 03:24:59 PM EST

Since Web 2.0 kicked off scarcely a day goes by without a headline targeting mashups and their enablers, AJAX and Web Services, as the next hot Web technologies. Mashups are Web sites that integrate a variety of services (e.g., news feeds, weather reports, maps, and traffic conditions) in new and interesting ways. Just take a look at Zillow.com, which provides instant home valuations plotted as thumbtacks on a map (Figure 1), or HousingMaps.com, which marks listings from craigslist.org as captions on a map, and you'll get a clear picture of the power behind converging data sources.

@ThingsExpo Stories
The worldwide cellular network will be the backbone of the future IoT, and the telecom industry is clamoring to get on board as more than just a data pipe. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Evan McGee, CTO of Ring Plus, Inc., discussed what service operators can offer that would benefit IoT entrepreneurs, inventors, and consumers. Evan McGee is the CTO of RingPlus, a leading innovative U.S. MVNO and wireless enabler. His focus is on combining web technologies with traditional telecom to create a new breed of unified communication that is easily accessible to the general consumer. With over a de...
Disruptive macro trends in technology are impacting and dramatically changing the "art of the possible" relative to supply chain management practices through the innovative use of IoT, cloud, machine learning and Big Data to enable connected ecosystems of engagement. Enterprise informatics can now move beyond point solutions that merely monitor the past and implement integrated enterprise fabrics that enable end-to-end supply chain visibility to improve customer service delivery and optimize supplier management. Learn about enterprise architecture strategies for designing connected systems tha...
Cloud is not a commodity. And no matter what you call it, computing doesn’t come out of the sky. It comes from physical hardware inside brick and mortar facilities connected by hundreds of miles of networking cable. And no two clouds are built the same way. SoftLayer gives you the highest performing cloud infrastructure available. One platform that takes data centers around the world that are full of the widest range of cloud computing options, and then integrates and automates everything. Join SoftLayer on June 9 at 16th Cloud Expo to learn about IBM Cloud's SoftLayer platform, explore se...
SYS-CON Media announced today that 9 out of 10 " most read" DevOps articles are published by @DevOpsSummit Blog. Launched in October 2014, @DevOpsSummit Blog offers top articles, news stories, and blog posts from the world's well-known experts and guarantees better exposure for its authors than any other publication. The widespread success of cloud computing is driving the DevOps revolution in enterprise IT. Now as never before, development teams must communicate and collaborate in a dynamic, 24/7/365 environment. There is no time to wait for long development cycles that produce softw...
15th Cloud Expo, which took place Nov. 4-6, 2014, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA, expanded the conference content of @ThingsExpo, Big Data Expo, and DevOps Summit to include two developer events. IBM held a Bluemix Developer Playground on November 5 and ElasticBox held a Hackathon on November 6. Both events took place on the expo floor. The Bluemix Developer Playground, for developers of all levels, highlighted the ease of use of Bluemix, its services and functionality and provide short-term introductory projects that developers can complete between sessions.
From telemedicine to smart cars, digital homes and industrial monitoring, the explosive growth of IoT has created exciting new business opportunities for real time calls and messaging. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Ivelin Ivanov, CEO and Co-Founder of Telestax, shared some of the new revenue sources that IoT created for Restcomm – the open source telephony platform from Telestax. Ivelin Ivanov is a technology entrepreneur who founded Mobicents, an Open Source VoIP Platform, to help create, deploy, and manage applications integrating voice, video and data. He is the co-founder of TeleStax, a...
The Internet of Things (IoT) promises to evolve the way the world does business; however, understanding how to apply it to your company can be a mystery. Most people struggle with understanding the potential business uses or tend to get caught up in the technology, resulting in solutions that fail to meet even minimum business goals. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Jesse Shiah, CEO / President / Co-Founder of AgilePoint Inc., showed what is needed to leverage the IoT to transform your business. He discussed opportunities and challenges ahead for the IoT from a market and technical point of vie...
With major technology companies and startups seriously embracing IoT strategies, now is the perfect time to attend @ThingsExpo in Silicon Valley. Learn what is going on, contribute to the discussions, and ensure that your enterprise is as "IoT-Ready" as it can be! Internet of @ThingsExpo, taking place Nov 3-5, 2015, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA, is co-located with 17th Cloud Expo and will feature technical sessions from a rock star conference faculty and the leading industry players in the world. The Internet of Things (IoT) is the most profound change in personal an...
The 3rd International @ThingsExpo, co-located with the 16th International Cloud Expo – to be held June 9-11, 2015, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY – is now accepting Hackathon proposals. Hackathon sponsorship benefits include general brand exposure and increasing engagement with the developer ecosystem. At Cloud Expo 2014 Silicon Valley, IBM held the Bluemix Developer Playground on November 5 and ElasticBox held the DevOps Hackathon on November 6. Both events took place on the expo floor. The Bluemix Developer Playground, for developers of all levels, highlighted the ease of use of...
Grow your business with enterprise wearable apps using SAP Platforms and Google Glass. SAP and Google just launched the SAP and Google Glass Challenge, an opportunity for you to innovate and develop the best Enterprise Wearable App using SAP Platforms and Google Glass and gain valuable market exposure. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Brian McPhail, Senior Director of Business Development, ISVs & Digital Commerce at SAP, outlined the timeline of the SAP Google Glass Challenge and the opportunity for developers, start-ups, and companies of all sizes to engage with SAP today.
Enthusiasm for the Internet of Things has reached an all-time high. In 2013 alone, venture capitalists spent more than $1 billion dollars investing in the IoT space. With "smart" appliances and devices, IoT covers wearable smart devices, cloud services to hardware companies. Nest, a Google company, detects temperatures inside homes and automatically adjusts it by tracking its user's habit. These technologies are quickly developing and with it come challenges such as bridging infrastructure gaps, abiding by privacy concerns and making the concept a reality. These challenges can't be addressed w...
The industrial software market has treated data with the mentality of “collect everything now, worry about how to use it later.” We now find ourselves buried in data, with the pervasive connectivity of the (Industrial) Internet of Things only piling on more numbers. There’s too much data and not enough information. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Bob Gates, Global Marketing Director, GE’s Intelligent Platforms business, to discuss how realizing the power of IoT, software developers are now focused on understanding how industrial data can create intelligence for industrial operations. Imagine ...
SYS-CON Events announced today that Liaison Technologies, a leading provider of data management and integration cloud services and solutions, has been named "Silver Sponsor" of SYS-CON's 16th International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on June 9-11, 2015, at the Javits Center in New York, NY. Liaison Technologies is a recognized market leader in providing cloud-enabled data integration and data management solutions to break down complex information barriers, enabling enterprises to make smarter decisions, faster.
The 17th International Cloud Expo has announced that its Call for Papers is open. 17th International Cloud Expo, to be held November 3-5, 2015, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA, brings together Cloud Computing, APM, APIs, Microservices, Security, Big Data, Internet of Things, DevOps and WebRTC to one location. With cloud computing driving a higher percentage of enterprise IT budgets every year, it becomes increasingly important to plant your flag in this fast-expanding business opportunity. Submit your speaking proposal today!
Hadoop as a Service (as offered by handful of niche vendors now) is a cloud computing solution that makes medium and large-scale data processing accessible, easy, fast and inexpensive. In his session at Big Data Expo, Kumar Ramamurthy, Vice President and Chief Technologist, EIM & Big Data, at Virtusa, will discuss how this is achieved by eliminating the operational challenges of running Hadoop, so one can focus on business growth. The fragmented Hadoop distribution world and various PaaS solutions that provide a Hadoop flavor either make choices for customers very flexible in the name of opti...
Cultural, regulatory, environmental, political and economic (CREPE) conditions over the past decade are creating cross-industry solution spaces that require processes and technologies from both the Internet of Things (IoT), and Data Management and Analytics (DMA). These solution spaces are evolving into Sensor Analytics Ecosystems (SAE) that represent significant new opportunities for organizations of all types. Public Utilities throughout the world, providing electricity, natural gas and water, are pursuing SmartGrid initiatives that represent one of the more mature examples of SAE. We have s...
The Internet of Things will put IT to its ultimate test by creating infinite new opportunities to digitize products and services, generate and analyze new data to improve customer satisfaction, and discover new ways to gain a competitive advantage across nearly every industry. In order to help corporate business units to capitalize on the rapidly evolving IoT opportunities, IT must stand up to a new set of challenges. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Jeff Kaplan, Managing Director of THINKstrategies, will examine why IT must finally fulfill its role in support of its SBUs or face a new round of...
The 4th International Internet of @ThingsExpo, co-located with the 17th International Cloud Expo - to be held November 3-5, 2015, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA - announces that its Call for Papers is open. The Internet of Things (IoT) is the biggest idea since the creation of the Worldwide Web more than 20 years ago.
Wearable devices have come of age. The primary applications of wearables so far have been "the Quantified Self" or the tracking of one's fitness and health status. We propose the evolution of wearables into social and emotional communication devices. Our BE(tm) sensor uses light to visualize the skin conductance response. Our sensors are very inexpensive and can be massively distributed to audiences or groups of any size, in order to gauge reactions to performances, video, or any kind of presentation. In her session at @ThingsExpo, Jocelyn Scheirer, CEO & Founder of Bionolux, will discuss ho...
The true value of the Internet of Things (IoT) lies not just in the data, but through the services that protect the data, perform the analysis and present findings in a usable way. With many IoT elements rooted in traditional IT components, Big Data and IoT isn’t just a play for enterprise. In fact, the IoT presents SMBs with the prospect of launching entirely new activities and exploring innovative areas. CompTIA research identifies several areas where IoT is expected to have the greatest impact.