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Who Are The All-Time Heroes of i-Technology?

From Ada, Countess of Lovelace to Jamie Zawinski

 I wonder how many people, as I did, found themselves thrown into confusion by the death last week of Jean Ichbiah (pictured), inventor of Ada. 

Learning that the inventor of a computer programming language is already old enough to have lived 66 years (Ichbiah was 66 when he succumbed to brain cancer) is a little like learning that your 11-year-old daughter has grown up and left home or that the first car you ever bought no longer is legal because it runs on gasoline in an age where all automobiles must run on water. How can something as novel, as new, as a computing language possibly already be so old-fangled that an early practitioner like Ichbiah can already no longer be with us?

The thought was so disquieting that it took me immediately back to the last time I wrote about Ichbiah, and indeed about Ada Lovelace for whom his language was named. It was in the context of my quest a couple of years ago to identify the Top Twenty Software People in the World.

It began as an innocent enough exercise, inadvertently kick-started by Tim Bray writing in his popular "Ongoing" blog about how he rated Google's Adam Bosworth as "probably one of the top 20 software people in the world."  Already famous for Quattro Pro, Microsoft Access, and Internet Explorer 4 even before he joined BEA as VP of engineering in 2001, when BEA bought Crossgain, the company he'd by then cofounded after leaving Microsoft, Bosworth went on to become BEA's chief architect before leaving to join Google. Definitely a shoo-in for the Top Twenty then. But the question naturally arose - or at least it did in my mind - who are the other 19?

I knew that it would not be easy to answer, and not because there are too few candidates but because there are too many. The names of today's leading i-technologists - whose collective smarts Internet technologies rely on for their unceasing innovation and ingenuity - trip off most people's tongues in a heartbeat: just think of Sergey Brin, Bill Joy, Linus Torvalds, Tim Berners-Lee, James Gosling, Anders Hejlsberg, Don Box, Nathan Myhrvold, W. Daniel Hillis, Mitch Kapor... all clear members of the "technorati" or "digerati" - call them what you will - the undisputed aristocrats of the online world.

But what about those who came before, the precursors of the current crop of talent? I wrote at the time:

"Can a list of the Top 20 i-Technologists possibly be compiled that doesn't cause the online equivalent of fistfights when published? Obviously not. But that shouldn't deter us from trying."

My inbox soon began to fill up with a deluge of nominations, and within days I was able to list forty mind-bogglingly gifted candidates, as follows (click on the name for a brief description of the individual concerned):

 

  • Tim Berners-Lee: "Father of the World Wide Web" and expectant father of the Semantic Web
  • Joshua Bloch: Formerly at Sun, where he helped architect Java's core platform; now at Google
  • Grady Booch: One of the original developers of the Unified Modeling Language
  • Adam Bosworth: Famous for Quattro Pro, Microsoft Access, and IE4; then BEA, now Google
  • Don Box: Co-author of SOAP
  • Stewart Brand: Co-founder in 1984 of the WELL bulletin board
  • Tim Bray: One of the prime movers of XML, now with Sun
  • Dan Bricklin: Co-creator (with Bob Frankston) of VisiCalc, the first PC spreadsheet
  • Larry Brilliant: Co-founder in 1984 of the WELL bulletin board
  • Sergey Brin: Son-of-college-math-professor turned co-founder of Google
  • Dave Cutler: The brains behind VMS; hired away by Microsoft for Windows NT
  • Don Ferguson: Inventor of the J2EE application server at IBM, now with Microsoft
  • Roy T. Fielding: Primary architect of HTTP 1.1 and a founder of the Apache Web server
  • Bob Frankston: Cocreator (with Dan Bricklin) of VisiCalc, the first PC spreadsheet
  • Jon Gay: The "Father of Flash"
  • James Gosling: "Father of Java" (though not its sole parent)
  • Anders Hejlsberg: Genius behind the Turbo Pascal compiler, subsequently "Father of C#"
  • Daniel W. Hillis: VP of R&D at the Walt Disney Company; cofounder, Thinking Machines
  • Miguel de Icaza: Co-founder of Ximian, now with Novell
  • Martin Fowler: Famous for work on refactoring, XP, and UML
  • Bill Joy: Co-founder and former chief scientist of Sun; main author of Berkeley Unix
  • Mitch Kapor: Designer of Lotus 1-2-3, founder of Lotus Development Corporation
  • Brian Kernighan: One of the creators of the AWK and AMPL languages
  • Mitchell Kertzman: Former programmer, founder, and CEO of Powersoft (later Sybase)
  • Klaus Knopper: Prime mover of Knoppix, a Linux distro that runs directly from a CD
  • Craig McClanahan: Of Tomcat, Struts, and JSF fame
  • Nathan Myhrvold: Theoretical and mathematical physicist, former CTO at Microsoft
  • Tim O'Reilly: Publisher, open source advocate; believer that great technology needs great books
  • Jean Paoli: One of the co-creators of the XML 1.0 standard with the W3C; now with Microsoft
  • John Patrick: Former VP of Internet technology at IBM, now "e-tired"
  • Rob Pike: An early developer of Unix and windowing system (GUI) technology
  • Dennis Ritchie: Creator of C and coinventor of Unix
  • Richard Stallman: Free software movement's leading figure; founder of the GNU Project
  • Bjarne Stroustrup: The designer and original implementor of C++
  • Andy Tanenbaum: Professor of computer science, author of Minix
  • Ken Thompson: Co-inventor of Unix
  • Linus Torvalds: "Benevolent dictator" of the Linux kernel
  • Alan Turing: Mathematician; author of the 1950 paper "Computing Machinery and Intelligence"
  • Guido van Rossum: Author of the Python programming language
  • Ann Winblad: Former programmer, cofounder of Hummer Winblad Venture Partners

It was at this point that the name of The Father of Ada was thrown into the hopper, along with that of Ada Lovelace herself. How could I possibly not have already included Jean Ichbiah, many wrote to say? Indeed the one new submission was more indignant than the next, and I soon expanded the list of candidates from forty to one hundred, by adding the following sixty:

Gene Amdahl: Implementer in the 60s of a milestone in computer technology: the concept of compatibility between systems

Marc Andreessen: Pioneer of Mosaic, the first browser to navigate the WWW; co-founder of Netscape

Charles Babbage: Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at Cambridge in 1828; inventor of the 'calculating machine'

John Backus: Inventor (with IBM) of FORTRAN (FORmula TRANslator) in 1956

Kent Beck: Creator of JUnit and pioneer of eXtreme Programming (XP)

Bob Bemer: One of the developers of COBOL and the ASCII naming standard for IBM (1960s)

D J Bernstein: Author of qmail

Fred Brooks: Co-creator of OS/390, helping change the way we think about software development

Luca Cardelli: Implementer of the first compiler for ML (the most popular typed functional language) and one of the earliest direct-manipulation user-interface editors

Vincent Cerf: "The Father of the Internet," co-inventor with Robert Kahn of the first Internetworking Protocol, TCP

Brad Cox: Father of Objective-C

Alonzo Church: Co-creator with Alan Turing of the "Church-Turing Thesis"

Alistair Cockburn: Helped craft the Agile Development Manifesto

Edgar (Ted) Codd: "Father of Relational Databases," inventor of SQL and creator of RDBMS systems

Larry Constantine: Inventor of data flow diagrams; presented first paper on concepts of structured design in 1968

Ole-Johan Dahl: Developer (with Kristen Nygaard) of SIMULA, the first object-oriented programming language.

Tom DeMarco: A principal of the computer systems think tank, Atlantic Systems Guild

Theo de Raadt: Founder of the OpenBSD and OpenSSH projects

Edsger W. Dijkstra: One of the moving forces behind the acceptance of computer programming as a scientific discipline; developer of the first compilers

Brendan Eich: Inventor of JavaScript; Chief Architect of the Mozilla Project

Robert Elz: University of Melbourne Department of Computer Science

Richard P. Feynman: Legendary physicist and teacher, teacher of Caltech course 1983-86 called Potentialities and Limitations of Computing Machines

Bill Gates: Chief Software Architect (and Lord High Chief Everything Else) of "the world's #1 company" (Hoovers.com)

Adele Goldberg: Developer of SmallTalk along with Alan Kay; wrote much of the documentation

Andy Hertzfield: Eazel developer and Macintosh forefather

Grace Murray Hopper: Developer of the first compiled high level programming language, COBOL

Jordan Hubbard: One of the creators of FreeBSD; currently a manager of Apple's Darwin project

Jean D Ichbiah: Principal designer, Ada language (1977)

Ken Iverson: Inventor of APL, later J

William Kahan: "The Old Man of Floating-Point;" primary architect behind the IEEE 754 standard for loating-point computation

Robert Kahn: Co-inventor with Vincent Cerf of the first Internetworking Protocol, TCP

Mike Karels: System architect for 4.3BSD

Alan Kay: Inventor of SmallTalk

Gary Kildall: Author of the archetpical OS known as CP/M (control Program for Microcomputers)

Donald Knuth: "Father of Computer Science" - author of The Art of Computer Programming; inventor of TeX, allowing typesetting of text and mathematical formulas on a PC

Butler Lampson: Architect of Cedar/Mesa; Implementer of Xerox Alto

Robert C. Martin: Agile software development proponent; CEO, president, and founder of Object Mentor

Yukihiro Matsumoto ("Matz"): Creator of Ruby

John McCarthy: Creator, with his graduate students, of Lisp

Doug McIlroy: Head of department at Bell Labs where UNIX started

Bob Metcalfe: Creator of Ethernet

Chuck Moore: Inventor of Forth, a high-level programming language

Andrew Morton: Linus's No. 2 in the kernel group

Ted Nelson: Creator of the Xanadu project - universal, democratic hypertext library; precursor to the WWW

Kristen Nygaard: Developer (with Ole-Johan Dahl) of SIMULA, the first object-oriented programming language.

Peter Pag: Pioneer of 4GLS (1979); developed Software AG's Natural

Bob Pasker: founder of WebLogic, author of the first Java Application Server

Benjamin Pierce: Harvard University faculty member for 49 years; recognized in his time as one of America's leading mathematicians

P J Plauger: Chair of the ANSI C committee

Jon Postel: "The 'North Star' Who Defined the Internet"

John Postley: Developed Mark IV (1967), the first million dollar software product, for Informatics

Martin Richards: Designer of the BCPL Cintcode System

Martin Roesch: Author of the open-source program Snort in 1998

Gurusamy Sarathy: Heavily involved in maintaining the mainstream releases of Perl for the past 7 years

Carl Sassenrath: Author of REBOL, a scripting language

Guy L. Steele: Author of athoritative books and papers on Lisp

W. Richard Stevens: "Guru of the Unix Gurus"; author and consultant

Ivan Sutherland: Considered by many to be the creator of Computer Graphics

Avadis (Avie) Tevanian: Chief Software Technology Officer, Apple

Guy (Bud) Tribble: One of the industry's top experts in software design and object-oriented programming

Patrick Volkerding: Creator of Slackware Linux

Larry Wall: Author of Perl

John Warnock: Inventor of PostScript; CEO of Adobe Systems

Michael "Monty" Widenius: Creator of MySQL

Nicklaus Wirth: Inventor of Algol W, Pascal, Modula, Modula-2, and Oberon

Stephen Wolfram: Scientist, creator of Mathematica

Jamie Zawinski: Instrumental in the creation of Lucid Emacs (now XEmacs)

Now we all know that there are others, that this list of 100 candidates barely scratches the surface, so....have at it: who's been left out? Once I have compiled a definitive list of, say, 150, I will devise a means by which we can vote and decide once and for all which 99 should join Adam Bosworth (who, for the record, loathes the whole idea of any such exercise, as does Tim Bray - who calls such popularity contests "moronic"; both would I am quite certain wish me to record here that this entire exercise owes nothing to their actual input, only to Tim's blogged remark en passant all those years ago...)

Over to you!

More Stories By Jeremy Geelan

Jeremy Geelan is Chairman & CEO of the 21st Century Internet Group, Inc. and an Executive Academy Member of the International Academy of Digital Arts & Sciences. Formerly he was President & COO at Cloud Expo, Inc. and Conference Chair of the worldwide Cloud Expo series. He appears regularly at conferences and trade shows, speaking to technology audiences across six continents. You can follow him on twitter: @jg21.

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Most Recent Comments
Justin Hart 02/18/07 11:20:16 PM EST

Vint Cerf's name is Vinton Cerf, not Vincent Cerf.

pvdg 02/09/07 07:20:28 PM EST

I'd begin with:

N°1 : Charles Babbage (designed the first computer)
N°2 : Konrad Zuse (built the first working computer)

pvdg 02/09/07 07:09:09 PM EST

What about Seymour Cray?

Bill Gates was a "hero of i-Technology" and I didn't know? What technology did he invented?

kjell krona 02/06/07 01:03:36 PM EST

In your list of IT heroes, I am missing some of the important people involved in the Graphical User Interface, as first instantiated in Macintosh UI (and later was copied by Microsoft):
Douglas Engelbart, who at SRI in the 60's invented, among other things, the idea of a mouse, overlapping windows, hypertext, outlining, video collaboration, and many other things that later inspired a lot of people to improve interaction with computers;
Larry Tesler, who at Xerox Parc (working with Alan Kay on Smalltalk) invented among other things the modeless editor and, I believe, cut/copy/paste, and later moved to Apple and worked on the Lisa and Macintosh;
Bill Atkinson, who wrote the "Quickdraw" graphics layer in Macintosh, proving that advanced bitmapped graphics was possible on a low-end processor; the orignal MacPaint, basically the predecessor to Photoshop, without which the graphical world today would be lost; and Apple HyperCard, which with its successors showed what "user programming" could mean, and accustomed people to the idea of "linking" pieces of information with clickable buttons, which subsequently exploded in the World Wide Web.

- kjell

Lars Arvestad 02/06/07 06:04:03 AM EST

|| m6 commented on the 6 Feb 2007:
|| Can someone explain to me why Jamie Z is
|| a hero?

The word "hero" should of course be used sparingly, and probably not in adjunction to "tech", but JWZ holds his place among the Big Hackers, IMHO.

Some of his accomplishments, in no particular order:
* XEmacs. He was one of (the?) main people making a user-friendly version of GNU Emacs.
* XKeyCaps. This little application has really helped me getting a sane keyboard layout under X a few times.
* Mosaic. I believe he was the main hacker on the Unix version of the first "real" browser. And one of the first employees at Netscape.

fm6 02/06/07 05:15:53 AM EST

Can someone explain to me why Jamie Z is a hero? I only know him from reading his comments in the Netscape keyboard resource file when I was trying to get the browser to behave under Linux. These left me with a permanent dislike for the dude: instead of explaining the format of the file, he put in lengthy sarcastic (and misinformed) rants about the "mistakes" made by various Unix vendors in designing their keyboards.

Ron Blessing 02/05/07 01:36:09 PM EST

Every time I see one of the computer Hall of Fame articles in a magazine
it seems to me there is always one glaring omission. I know there are
many that have contributed but I feel like there are two people that
deserve to be mentioned and always seem to be missed. Ward Christensen
and Randy Suess, in my opinion, started what eventually led to our
current Internet when they launched the first dialup Bulletin Board
system called CBBS. In addition, Ward developed the first widespread
file transfer protocol, XMODEM, which allowed files to be transferred
error free between bulletin boards around the world.

...Ron Blessing

Grady Booch 02/05/07 11:45:30 AM EST

I'm quite flatted that you've numbered me among your top twenty all-time technology heroes.

As for the Renaissance jazz bit, I play the Celtic harp, on which I perform a number of medieval and renaissance pieces. I once had an instructor who taught me some great improvisational skills, and thus the phrase, Renaissance jazz, for I like to do riffs off of really old themes.

I think I would have been an itinerant musician or a priest if I were not doing software :-)

Grady

InOtherNews 02/05/07 08:34:39 AM EST

Yakov Fain has devised his own version over here: http://yakovfain.javadevelopersjournal.com/who_are_the_heroes_of_itechno... in case anyone wants to take a look.

More Nominees 02/05/07 06:19:39 AM EST

There's a great supplemetary list by Mark Hinkle here: http://www.encoreopus.com/content/view/334/35/.

Among the new names he adds are Jarkko Oikarinen, Bram Cohen, and Jerry Yang & David Filo, the founders of Yahoo!

i-net user 02/05/07 01:21:03 AM EST

Congratulaions, you have just insured that I will never willing used AJAX in any of my projects. Your pop-over add that blocks the article is annoying at best.

Barry Threw 02/05/07 12:54:00 AM EST

Vannevar Bush
Norbert Weiner
John Von Neumann
Claude Shannon
John Pierce

kelley meck 02/04/07 11:44:05 PM EST

You have to include Claude Shannon, and you might want to consider Oliver Selfridge. Shannon was the mathematician who figured information theory, and Selfridge started everything behind neural networks--which have never caught up with modal programming, but whose promise is unbounded.

Lee Butler 02/04/07 09:34:23 PM EST

You should also remember Michael J. Muuss. He developed "ping" and was instrumental in some of the developments of TCP/IP and Unix in the early days. He worked at the Army's Ballistic Research Laboratory.

Carsten Schlemm 02/04/07 08:19:22 PM EST

Jeremy,
I am a bit disappointed you forgot Konrad Zuse (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zuse). His problem is that he doesn't have an Anglosaxon name....
Judge for yourself.

Cheers,

Carsten

Troy Angrignon 02/04/07 07:55:13 PM EST

Jeremy, great post. Here are my additional nominations:

http://www.troyangrignon.com/blog/_archives/2007/2/4/2709776.html

w3c 02/04/07 07:25:58 PM EST

I would nominate Dave Raggett (W3C). Over the years, Dave has been involved in the design of many important Web Technologies, starting with HTML (tables etc.), CSS, VoiceXML, MathML and XForms. He's also the author of Tidy, an important tool for Web developers.

Mike Radow 02/04/07 07:01:24 PM EST

Nomination for ''all-time hero"...: "Paul Baran" ( go to www.google.com ) He invented _packet-switching_ ( funded by DARPA ) for the ArpaNet.
-
He is certainly worthy of your consideration. Thanks!
Regards, [email protected]
-
-eot-

Mike Radow 02/04/07 07:01:24 PM EST

Nomination for ''all-time hero"...: "Paul Baran" ( go to www.google.com ) He invented _packet-switching_ ( funded by DARPA ) for the ArpaNet.
-
He is certainly worthy of your consideration. Thanks!
Regards, [email protected]
-
-eot-

Mike Radow 02/04/07 07:01:24 PM EST

Nomination for ''all-time hero"...: "Paul Baran" ( go to www.google.com ) He invented _packet-switching_ ( funded by DARPA ) for the ArpaNet.
-
He is certainly worthy of your consideration. Thanks!
Regards, [email protected]
-
-eot-

Mike Radow 02/04/07 07:01:09 PM EST

Nomination for ''all-time hero"...: "Paul Baran" ( go to www.google.com ) He invented _packet-switching_ ( funded by DARPA ) for the ArpaNet.
-
He is certainly worthy of your consideration. Thanks!
Regards, [email protected]
-
-eot-

Mike Radow 02/04/07 07:01:08 PM EST

Nomination for ''all-time hero"...: "Paul Baran" ( go to www.google.com ) He invented _packet-switching_ ( funded by DARPA ) for the ArpaNet.
-
He is certainly worthy of your consideration. Thanks!
Regards, [email protected]
-
-eot-

Mike Radow 02/04/07 07:01:04 PM EST

Nomination for ''all-time hero"...: "Paul Baran" ( go to www.google.com ) He invented _packet-switching_ ( funded by DARPA ) for the ArpaNet.
-
He is certainly worthy of your consideration. Thanks!
Regards, [email protected]
-
-eot-

a VMS afficianado in days past 02/04/07 06:20:43 PM EST

Dave Cutler, while quite brilliant, was hardly the "brains behind VMS". He worked on it, sure. And he contributed a lot. But he didn't create it and wasn't in the early architectural planning; he came along later. Maybe you should say he was "a major contributor to VMS" to be accurate.

ccrmalite 02/04/07 05:34:16 PM EST

When discussing the heroes of "I-Technology", no list would be complete without Max Mathews, the pioneering creator of the first digital music systems at Bell Labs in the 1950s upon which all digital music software and research was based. These days, imagining a computer system without music seems impossible yet without Max's work on the Music I-Music V computer music languages, we wouldn't be rocking out on our iTunes while reading this article, let alone creating digitally based music of any kind. For those who don't know Max, remember the end of Kubrick's "2001: A Space Odyssey", when a dying HAL sings an homage to Max's influential early recording of "Daisy," signifying one of the computer's earliest memories. Kubrick got it right, I strongly suggest you add Max to your list.

Andy Poggio 02/04/07 04:43:00 PM EST

Please add Doug Engelbart to your list of heros of i-Technology. If you are unfamiliar with his work, just Google his name or "mother of all demos". Doug and his group at SRI international pioneered many of the things we now take for granted, e.g. hypertext networked documents, videoconferencing, collaborative work, and the mouse.

an0n 02/04/07 04:25:26 PM EST

Presper Eckert (ENIAC)
Alex Stepanov (STL)
J.C.R. Licklider (ARPA)
Charles Goldfarb et al (SGML)
Jim Clarke (Silicon Graphics, Netscape)

Agree this is in part a popularity contest. Some of the ones on the original list were influential tech CEOs or Chief Architects in their time, but does that Hall of Fame material?

And if you say "Myrhvold", I think you must also say Bruce and ESR....

Andrew 02/04/07 12:33:44 PM EST

Ed De Castro deserves to be on the list as the inventor of the personal computer - The PDP8 was my first personal computer, even if not yours :-)

Jeff LaMarche 02/04/07 11:26:11 AM EST

Grace Hopper did not invent COBOL. She absolutely 100% should be on the list, but she should be on the list for what she did do. She invented a language called FLOW-MATIC, which was then later used as the starting point by COBOL, which was (quite obviously) designed by committee wthout any further input from Admiral Hopper. She later used COBOL, but she had no direct participation in COBOL.

Much more important, though, she came up with the groundbreaking concept that computer programs could be written in a more English-like language rather than in machine code, something we all take for granted now, but which really was one of the key enablers that allowed computers to become what they are today.

Fellowship 02/04/07 08:28:41 AM EST

>> There is no genius in JUnit, unless you
>> count the hype machine that culimated in
>> Kent Beck's name appearing on this list.

Didn't Beck become an Agitar Software Fellow a while back? Alberto Savoia, co-founder and CTO of Agitar specifically called him "one of my heroes" - here's a link to the announcement back in '04: http://www.agitar.com/news/pr/20040802.html

Jeremy Epstein 02/04/07 05:03:06 AM EST

Here's a few key people I think should be on the list:

Steve Bellovin - author of USENET, security researcher, author of the seminal book (with Bill Cheswick) on firewalls

David Bell & Len LaPadula - developed the multi-level security model used to represent military security

Gene Spafford - leader of CERIAS at Purdue Univ, which spun off numerous security product companies (e.g., Tripwire, ISS)

Roger Schell - very early proponent of attacker models; first penetration tester; architect for highly secure systems

jim scandale 02/04/07 03:58:03 AM EST

there are an awful lot of what I would call purely hardware people. No doubt that they contributed greatly but "software people" they're not.
And Fred Brooks seems to have fallen off of the list.

"Inventor of the Internet" Missing 02/04/07 03:08:29 AM EST

Shouldn't Al Gore get a token place in the list?

"During my service in the United States Congress, I took the initiative in creating the Internet."

;-)

OOPS 02/03/07 05:11:49 PM EST

Bertrand Meyer not on the list? (Eiffel and Design By Contract)

Eric Sarjeant 02/03/07 03:33:40 PM EST

I think Ward Cunningham, the creator of the "Wiki" deserves to be added to the list. If not the top 40, then surely the next 60.

Kelly 02/03/07 03:32:09 PM EST

Overall, a very reasonable list. Lots of luminaries there. Then I saw "Kent Beck, creator of JUnit and pioneer of XTreme Programming" Ergh! Sorry, I just vomited a little bit, in my mouth... Give me a break! JUnit took what? An afternoon to come up with? There is no genius in JUnit, unless you count the hype machine that culimated in Kent Beck's name appearing on this list.

Wolbdrab 02/03/07 03:31:08 PM EST

Glad to see John von Neumann and John Backus recommended.
I would add Nicholas Negroponti and William Gibson(!) (first explorer of cyberspace).

HTMHell 02/03/07 12:49:33 PM EST

I would challenge Tim Berners-Lee's positin on this list since it is HTML that has also brought us the Browser Wars, and the subsequent HTML writer's hell of trying to get a page to display properly on all the popular browsers, and all versions thereof.

The name HTML - Hyper Text Markup Language, implies a rich set of features that don't exist in reality

chiew 02/03/07 12:48:17 PM EST

Richard Stevens is the most deserving of inclusion in this entire list: everything is based on TCP/IP.

Knoppix Lover 02/03/07 12:45:47 PM EST

Has anyone nominated Karl Knopper yet - "Mr Knoppix"? Ah yes they have, I see, he was in the first 40. Quite right!

Dissenter 02/03/07 12:43:49 PM EST

Donald Knuth!? Knuth, like a lot of those listed, are just Ivory Tower acadamics with no real applications in industry

rusty0101 02/03/07 12:42:17 PM EST

Arguably Bill Gates did more for personal computers than most anyone else out there. I would have to point out however that most of what he has done is related to his business ability rather than his software writing abilities.

solarrhino 02/03/07 12:38:47 PM EST

You know, when I looked at this list, I found myself disappointed. Sure, there are some big important guys, but software is more than about applications and the big picture. It's also about the technology, and creating new abstractions. And in a lot of ways, the guy who first invented debugging is a lot more important to the success of computer science than anybody listed there.

It may be because I'm an old fart, but I remember the excitement of learning each new abstraction, either as I discovered it, or as it was invented. And it seemed to me that the creation of those abstractions are the really great deeds of computer science. Maybe nobody knows who had those break-through moments first, but I'm sure that they occured, and they seem to be to the the Great Moments in computer science.

1) The first guy to think "I shouldn't have to rewire, I should be able to write instructions that rewire it for me" - i.e., the assembler moment

2) The first guy to realize "I'm not just re-wiring this, I'm describing an procedure for it to use" - the FORTRAN moment

3) The first guy to ask "Why can't I used the same procedure from different places in my code" - the subroutine moment

4) The first guy to say "I should be able to use the subroutine in the program it already knows" - the library moment

5) The first guy to ask "Why do I have to be the one writing down the results?" - the printer moment

6) The first guy to realize "This isn't just a calculator, it's also a controller!" - the embedded moment

7) The first guy to realize "This isn't just a calculator, it's also a storage system!" - the database moment

8) The first guy to realize "This isn't just a calculator, it's also a communication system!" - the network moment

9) The first guy to realize "I'm not just submitting instructions for it to process - it's submiting instructions back for me to process!" - the interactive moment

10) The first guy to think "Why can't it do something else while its waiting?" - the multitasking moment

11) The first guy to think "Why can't it show me more context while I work?" - the full-screen moment

And finally...

12) The first guy to think "Man, why can't this thing show me some chicks?" - the porn moment

--
"Lord, grant that I may always be right, for Thou knowest that I am hard to turn" -- A Scots-Irish prayer

More Here 02/03/07 12:34:30 PM EST

How about pioneers like George Boole, John Louis von Neumann, and the 'Forgotten Father of the Computer' John Vincent Atanasoff?

bach_hoang 02/03/07 11:50:51 AM EST

It's nice to see some of the names (from the 70s) of those who advocated "open" systems (V Cerf, B Metcalfe, etc) from

Robert Sawken 02/03/07 11:24:59 AM EST

You need to add Ken Olson founder of Digital Equipment Corp. DEC owned the then mini computer market in the 70's and 80's
which was the "windows system alternative to Big Blue" of that time...

The people from DEC and RT-11, TOPS10, VAX, VMS, DECNET are some the major contributors in hardware and software like X-Windows, early Networking, first clustering, wrote much of Windows NT and are the senior developers and architects in a lot of today's technology industry...

Robert Sawken 02/03/07 11:24:57 AM EST

You need to add Ken Olson founder of Digital Equipment Corp. DEC owned the then mini computer market in the 70's and 80's
which was the "windows system alternative to Big Blue" of that time...

The people from DEC and RT-11, TOPS10, VAX, VMS, DECNET are some the major contributors in hardware and software like X-Windows, early Networking, first clustering, wrote much of Windows NT and are the senior developers and architects in a lot of today's technology industry...

queZZtion 02/03/07 09:36:50 AM EST

Where's Steve Jobs????

@ThingsExpo Stories
In their session at @ThingsExpo, Shyam Varan Nath, Principal Architect at GE, and Ibrahim Gokcen, who leads GE's advanced IoT analytics, focused on the Internet of Things / Industrial Internet and how to make it operational for business end-users. Learn about the challenges posed by machine and sensor data and how to marry it with enterprise data. They also discussed the tips and tricks to provide the Industrial Internet as an end-user consumable service using Big Data Analytics and Industrial Cloud.
SYS-CON Media announced that Splunk, a provider of the leading software platform for real-time Operational Intelligence, has launched an ad campaign on Big Data Journal. Splunk software and cloud services enable organizations to search, monitor, analyze and visualize machine-generated big data coming from websites, applications, servers, networks, sensors and mobile devices. The ads focus on delivering ROI - how improved uptime delivered $6M in annual ROI, improving customer operations by mining large volumes of unstructured data, and how data tracking delivers uptime when it matters most.
SYS-CON Events announced today that ActiveState, the leading independent Cloud Foundry and Docker-based PaaS provider, has been named “Silver Sponsor” of SYS-CON's DevOps Summit New York, which will take place June 9-11, 2015, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY. ActiveState believes that enterprises gain a competitive advantage when they are able to quickly create, deploy and efficiently manage software solutions that immediately create business value, but they face many challenges that prevent them from doing so. The Company is uniquely positioned to help address these challenges thro...
The Industrial Internet revolution is now underway, enabled by connected machines and billions of devices that communicate and collaborate. The massive amounts of Big Data requiring real-time analysis is flooding legacy IT systems and giving way to cloud environments that can handle the unpredictable workloads. Yet many barriers remain until we can fully realize the opportunities and benefits from the convergence of machines and devices with Big Data and the cloud, including interoperability, data security and privacy.
SYS-CON Media announced that Cisco, a worldwide leader in IT that helps companies seize the opportunities of tomorrow, has launched a new ad campaign in Cloud Computing Journal. The ad campaign, a webcast titled 'Is Your Data Center Ready for the Application Economy?', focuses on the latest data center networking technologies, including SDN or ACI, and how customers are using SDN and ACI in their organizations to achieve business agility. The Cisco webcast is available on-demand.
IoT is still a vague buzzword for many people. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Mike Kavis, Vice President & Principal Cloud Architect at Cloud Technology Partners, discussed the business value of IoT that goes far beyond the general public's perception that IoT is all about wearables and home consumer services. He also discussed how IoT is perceived by investors and how venture capitalist access this space. Other topics discussed were barriers to success, what is new, what is old, and what the future may hold. Mike Kavis is Vice President & Principal Cloud Architect at Cloud Technology Pa...
Dale Kim is the Director of Industry Solutions at MapR. His background includes a variety of technical and management roles at information technology companies. While his experience includes work with relational databases, much of his career pertains to non-relational data in the areas of search, content management, and NoSQL, and includes senior roles in technical marketing, sales engineering, and support engineering. Dale holds an MBA from Santa Clara University, and a BA in Computer Science from the University of California, Berkeley.
The Internet of Things (IoT) is rapidly in the process of breaking from its heretofore relatively obscure enterprise applications (such as plant floor control and supply chain management) and going mainstream into the consumer space. More and more creative folks are interconnecting everyday products such as household items, mobile devices, appliances and cars, and unleashing new and imaginative scenarios. We are seeing a lot of excitement around applications in home automation, personal fitness, and in-car entertainment and this excitement will bleed into other areas. On the commercial side, m...
The Internet of Things (IoT) promises to evolve the way the world does business; however, understanding how to apply it to your company can be a mystery. Most people struggle with understanding the potential business uses or tend to get caught up in the technology, resulting in solutions that fail to meet even minimum business goals. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Jesse Shiah, CEO / President / Co-Founder of AgilePoint Inc., showed what is needed to leverage the IoT to transform your business. He discussed opportunities and challenges ahead for the IoT from a market and technical point of vie...
SYS-CON Events announced today that CodeFutures, a leading supplier of database performance tools, has been named a “Sponsor” of SYS-CON's 16th International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on June 9–11, 2015, at the Javits Center in New York, NY. CodeFutures is an independent software vendor focused on providing tools that deliver database performance tools that increase productivity during database development and increase database performance and scalability during production.
Things are being built upon cloud foundations to transform organizations. This CEO Power Panel at 15th Cloud Expo, moderated by Roger Strukhoff, Cloud Expo and @ThingsExpo conference chair, addressed the big issues involving these technologies and, more important, the results they will achieve. Rodney Rogers, chairman and CEO of Virtustream; Brendan O'Brien, co-founder of Aria Systems, Bart Copeland, president and CEO of ActiveState Software; Jim Cowie, chief scientist at Dyn; Dave Wagstaff, VP and chief architect at BSQUARE Corporation; Seth Proctor, CTO of NuoDB, Inc.; and Andris Gailitis, C...
Today’s enterprise is being driven by disruptive competitive and human capital requirements to provide enterprise application access through not only desktops, but also mobile devices. To retrofit existing programs across all these devices using traditional programming methods is very costly and time consuming – often prohibitively so. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Jesse Shiah, CEO, President, and Co-Founder of AgilePoint Inc., discussed how you can create applications that run on all mobile devices as well as laptops and desktops using a visual drag-and-drop application – and eForms-buildi...
"People are a lot more knowledgeable about APIs now. There are two types of people who work with APIs - IT people who want to use APIs for something internal and the product managers who want to do something outside APIs for people to connect to them," explained Roberto Medrano, Executive Vice President at SOA Software, in this SYS-CON.tv interview at Cloud Expo, held Nov 4–6, 2014, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA.
Performance is the intersection of power, agility, control, and choice. If you value performance, and more specifically consistent performance, you need to look beyond simple virtualized compute. Many factors need to be considered to create a truly performant environment. In his General Session at 15th Cloud Expo, Harold Hannon, Sr. Software Architect at SoftLayer, discussed how to take advantage of a multitude of compute options and platform features to make cloud the cornerstone of your online presence.
Almost everyone sees the potential of Internet of Things but how can businesses truly unlock that potential. The key will be in the ability to discover business insight in the midst of an ocean of Big Data generated from billions of embedded devices via Systems of Discover. Businesses will also need to ensure that they can sustain that insight by leveraging the cloud for global reach, scale and elasticity.
“The age of the Internet of Things is upon us,” stated Thomas Svensson, senior vice-president and general manager EMEA, ThingWorx, “and working with forward-thinking companies, such as Elisa, enables us to deploy our leading technology so that customers can profit from complete, end-to-end solutions.” ThingWorx, a PTC® (Nasdaq: PTC) business and Internet of Things (IoT) platform provider, announced on Monday that Elisa, Finnish provider of mobile and fixed broadband subscriptions, will deploy ThingWorx® platform technology to enable a new Elisa IoT service in Finland and Estonia.
Advanced Persistent Threats (APTs) are increasing at an unprecedented rate. The threat landscape of today is drastically different than just a few years ago. Attacks are much more organized and sophisticated. They are harder to detect and even harder to anticipate. In the foreseeable future it's going to get a whole lot harder. Everything you know today will change. Keeping up with this changing landscape is already a daunting task. Your organization needs to use the latest tools, methods and expertise to guard against those threats. But will that be enough? In the foreseeable future attacks w...
As enterprises move to all-IP networks and cloud-based applications, communications service providers (CSPs) – facing increased competition from over-the-top providers delivering content via the Internet and independently of CSPs – must be able to offer seamless cloud-based communication and collaboration solutions that can scale for small, midsize, and large enterprises, as well as public sector organizations, in order to keep and grow market share. The latest version of Oracle Communications Unified Communications Suite gives CSPs the capability to do just that. In addition, its integration ...
From telemedicine to smart cars, digital homes and industrial monitoring, the explosive growth of IoT has created exciting new business opportunities for real time calls and messaging. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Ivelin Ivanov, CEO and Co-Founder of Telestax, shared some of the new revenue sources that IoT created for Restcomm – the open source telephony platform from Telestax. Ivelin Ivanov is a technology entrepreneur who founded Mobicents, an Open Source VoIP Platform, to help create, deploy, and manage applications integrating voice, video and data. He is the co-founder of TeleStax, a...
We certainly live in interesting technological times. And no more interesting than the current competing IoT standards for connectivity. Various standards bodies, approaches, and ecosystems are vying for mindshare and positioning for a competitive edge. It is clear that when the dust settles, we will have new protocols, evolved protocols, that will change the way we interact with devices and infrastructure. We will also have evolved web protocols, like HTTP/2, that will be changing the very core of our infrastructures. At the same time, we have old approaches made new again like micro-services...