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Targeting GPS - Integrating J2ME, GPS, and the Wireless Web

Targeting GPS - Integrating J2ME, GPS, and the Wireless Web

For location-based services, the open frameworks of J2ME and J2EE create interesting opportunities in the fields of software development and applied statistics. Traditionally, the software industry in these services has been closed and, as a result, the industry has suffered stagnation, particularly in the area of distributed systems and integration.

Just look at this most recent example – U.S. cell phone carriers didn’t meet the FCC October 2001 mandate for automatic location-based tracking for 911 calls over their networks. The most common reasons the carriers gave for missing the deadline were high costs and an inability to install the network infrastructure. With J2ME, XML, J2EE, and GPS, you can use the existing infrastructure (the Internet and your computer) to build and run such services from your garage, all for a very low cost (free).

With Java’s open architecture, you can build more exciting applications. GPS data contains the altitude and speed of a target, allowing the extraction of 3D information and vector coordinates. This can lead to interesting implementations, such as topographic position tracking of multiple targets or predicting the time two targets will intersect.

The use of wireless GPS and J2ME also allows more accurate tracking of targets because the historical GPS data can be stored in a database, enabling the integration of stochastic models and applications to monitor, predict, and correct movements before sending this information to a mobile device. Because of the limited graphical capability of mobile devices, there’s also a need for applications to convey location-based information through the use of colors, a feature of the more recent mobile devices.

The GPS application covered in this article tracks the user on a graphical plot and gives the distance of another target connected to the network. The target can also track the user. By going through the application, you can build a foundation to develop your own GPS services. We’ll discuss how to set up the test environment and show how to parse and handle GPS data on a mobile device and transfer GPS information back and forth between the device and a J2EE server. Thus, by integrating J2EE and J2ME, the mobile device harnesses the power of the server, allowing the development of intelligent, location-based applications.

Setting Up the Test Environment

Setting Up a GPS Receiver
A GPS receiver must meet two requirements for the application to work. First, it should be able to output NMEA 0183 (version 2.0 or higher) data as text; second, it shouldn’t require the receipt of an initialization string before sending data. eTrex from Garmin meets both requirements. Since the receiver hooks into the serial port on a PC (desktop or laptop), you need to obtain a GPS-to-serial-port adapter. Once connected, GPS data will flow through the communication port. Keep in mind that most GPS receivers don’t work indoors, so place the PC near a window where the receiver has clear access to the open sky. The receiver will need to get signals from at least three satellites to determine its position.

For those who don’t wish to go through the trouble and expense of dealing with a GPS receiver, the source code for this article includes a Java class file (HttpReader) that functions as a GPS data stream. (Listings 1–3 and the source code for this article can be downloaded from the JDJ Web site, www.sys-con.com/java/sourcec.cfm.) This class instance reads an HTML page that contains actual GPS data and returns its input stream. While this method is easier than using a GPS receiver, watching a plot of the author driving to his local grocery store is not nearly as much fun.

HTTP Connection
Since MIDP requires the implementation of a subset of HTTP 1.1, this protocol should work for all implementations of J2ME. Therefore the application uses HTTP to communicate with the server.

The server may reside on the local machine or on a LAN. For the server to be accessible over the Web, you need a wired or wireless Internet connection. However, a wireless connection provides the most usability for testing in a real production environment. This may be set up in a number of ways. A mobile phone with Internet access can hook up through a connector to a port on the laptop. Obtaining a wireless modem or doing a direct dial-up to a server hosting the server-side GPS application are other options.

Software Requirements
The GPS application requires the J2ME Wireless Toolkit from Sun and JDK 1.3 or higher. You also need the kXML package from Enhydra to handle XML on the MIDP device, as well as the xspsoft class files that are included in the download.

For the server-side applications, this article uses JBoss/Tomcat J2EE, which can be freely downloaded from www.jboss.org. Of course, you can also use any commercial J2EE implementation. You also need JAXB and JDK 1.4 from Sun.

The server application allows the user to transmit the GPS coordinates and to retrieve other people’s coordinates. If the you don’t wish to bother with EJBs and don’t care about tracking multiple targets, the server-side application can be eliminated without affecting the core GPS functionality on the MIDP device or emulator. (The application could also be rewritten using JSP and JDBC.)

NMEA Format
In the 1980s the National Marine Electronics Association (NMEA) developed the NMEA 0183 Interface Standard for data exchange between marine electronic devices. Today, most global positioning systems use the NMEA interface for data exchange. Thus the J2ME GPS data parser will work on any GPS receiver that implements this standard. Figure 1 contains a sample of a data stream:

NMEA Sentences
$GPRMC,214434,A,3753.666,N,12203.162,
     W,0.0,0.0,270901,15.4,E,A*33
$GPGGA,214616,3753.667,N,12203.167,W,
           1,04,5.6,121.1,M,-27.4,M,,*7
$GPGSA,A,3,01,03,20,22,,,,,,,,,7.
     4,5.6,1.5*36
$GPGSV,3,1,10,01,69,062,47,03,12,106,
     37,04,12,279,00,08,12,250,00*77
$GPGLL,3753.667,N,12203.167,W,
     214616,A,A*54
$GPBOD,,T,,M,,*47

Figure 1: GPS data stream

The $GPGGA sentence contains the target’s topological location information. The relevant fields are as follows:

Field
1 Message Header ($GPGGA)
3 - 4 Latitude, North/South
5 - 6 Longitude, East/West
10 Altitude in meters

The latitude 3753.667 denotes 37 degrees, 53 minutes, and 66.7 seconds. There are a couple of problems with this format. First, the longitude and latitude numbers are not base 10 numbers, so it’s difficult for an application to determine relative distances. Second, the KVM does not support floating or double primitive types nor the respective wrappers, making any decimal value an incorrect numerical format.

The answer is to use fixed-point integer calculations to handle decimal values. For example, the value of 100.234 is 100234, with a fixed point of three. The GpsParserImpl class instance normalizes the longitude and latitude coordinates by using the following code:

int nc = (10000 * k[0]) + (10000 * k[1])/60 +
(1000 * k[2])/3600;

where k[0] denotes the degrees (37), k[1] the minutes (53), and k[2] the seconds (667). The normalized integer value for this latitude is 379019.

To find the speed and direction of the target, we extract information from $GPRMC (fields 8 and 9, respectively). If the altitude field is blank, it means the GPS receiver isn’t able to pick up the signal from a fourth satellite, which is necessary for 3D tracking.

In this scenario the target is not moving, so the speed and direction fields contain 0.0. The J2ME application developer may use this information in interesting ways. For instance, you could display all targets moving over 60 m.p.h. in dark blue, or all targets moving north in green. This type of color-coding and dimensional reduction of information allows an enormous amount of location information to be displayed to the user of a limited mobile device. This will undoubtedly be an important area of future growth, research, and standardization for the mobile industry.

Accessing GPS Data Through the Serial Port
Opening the InputStream
Plugging the GPS receiver into the laptop or mobile device starts a stream of GPS data flowing over the serial port. Reading the input stream from the serial port is no different than reading an input stream from a file or an HTTP connection. As mentioned previously, you can use either HttpReader, which functions as a GPS data stream, or SerialReader to open a connection to an actual GPS receiver. Here’s the only difference in the code:

• SerialReader:

String URI = "comm:1;baudrate=4800;bitsper char=8";
InputConnection inputCon = (InputConnection) Connector.open(URI);
InputStream is = inputCon.openInputStream();

HttpReader:

String URI = "http://xspsoft:8080/GPS.html";
HttpConnection inputCon = (HttpConnection) Connector.open(URI);
InputStream is = inputCon.openInputStream();

Note that a SerialReader object opens a connection to the stream on communication port 1; however, your port number may be different. If you choose the wrong port, the KVM will throw an IOException stating that the system can’t find the specified file. If the port is occupied, the IOException states that the handle is invalid.

Each GPS receiver sends data at a certain baud rate. Ensure that the baud rate in the String URI matches the baud rate of your GPS receiver. If any of the bytes in the input stream are above 128, the baud rate is incorrect. The input stream will come through as garbage. Also make sure there are no spaces between the semicolons or the program will throw an exception.

Parsing the InputStream
The abstract class GpsParser contains the base code to read the GPS data stream. A concrete, direct subclass instance instantiates either the SerialReader or HttpReader, depending on the user’s preference. GpsParser returns an NMEA sentence as a character array, one line at a time, through the use of the Template Method and an abstract method denoted as com-mand(char[] c).

The GpsParserImpl class contains an example of a concrete implementation of the command instance method, which is executed for each NMEA sentence flowing through the serial port. In the GpsParserImpl class, the match-
Command class method determines whether the current NMEA sentence is the GPGGA sentence. If it is, the command method scans and tokenizes the data into a vector.

Invoking the GpsParserImpl constructor causes the GPS data stream to continually update the Coordinate class with the respective longitude and latitude information. Now any application can invoke the Coordinate accessor class methods – getLatitude, getLongitude, getAltitude, getSpeed, and getDirection – to get the most current position of the target.

Data Access Objects and the Transporting of Information
In this article various data sources, including a relational database, XML files, MIDP record stores, and GPS data streams, are coming over a serial port. Dealing with so many data sources can be overwhelming without a systematic design and structure of the application services. Using data access objects (DAOs) to access these data sources is a good design practice that will simplify the application. One example we’ve already discussed is the coordinate data access object (actually a class) that returns the most current location information of the target.

This application has three primary data access objects on the MIDP device that can marshal and unmarshal XML: SerialDataObject, EntityDataObject, and RecordDataObjectImpl. The SerialDataObject handles the unidirectional transfer of information from the serial port (through Coordinate DAO) to the server database. The EntityDataObject handles the unidirectional transfer from the database to class methods of CoordinateTarget on the MIDP device. The RecordDataObjectImpl handles the bidirectional transfer of information between the server database and the MIDP record store. While transferring data to the record store may be slow, it is, however, a vital component to building enterprise applications involving an MIDP device.

These data objects can be returned by invoking the getDataObject (String DAO) class method of the factory DataObjectFactory. IGps is a superinterface of all these classes, so these class instances are assured of having accessor instance methods for the GPS data. The SessionMinibean object will take care of the marshaling and unmarshaling as well as choosing the correct data access object. For example, to transfer GPS data from the serial port to the server database merely requires the following lines of code:

SessionMinibean smb = new SessionMinibean("SERIAL");
smb.marshal();

The database server will now contain the user’s longitude, latitude, altitude, speed, and direction. Another user, with the following lines of code, can retrieve this user’s latitude:

SessionMinibean smb = new
SessionMinibean("ENTITY");
smb.unmarshal();
int latitude =
CoordinateTarget.
getLatitude();

Note that the unmarshal method unmarshals the XML message and populates the class methods of Coord-
inateTarget, so any application has access to the target’s location through CoordinateTarget. Class methods are extremely useful for J2ME applications because of the expense of packing, unpacking, and searching for information within the persistent record store.

If you’d like a local record store copy of the data from the database server, use the following lines of code:

SessionMinibean smb = new
SessionMinibean("RECORD");
smb.unmarshal();

You could also invoke the marshal method and update a database on the server.

In short, we have the basis for wireless hot sync capability between the record store on the mobile device and the database server. Thus the user could set his or her GPS and target tracking preferences, upload the information to the database, and then hot sync from any other mobile device. Hot synchronization could also allow multiple people to synchronize their tracking of a single target or group of targets. Although the record store is not used in this article, the functionality exists within the GPS application download.

A Brief Digression on the MIDP Record Store
The J2ME services on the mobile device access persistent data through the Record Management System (RMS) API. In this example, we avoid the overhead of RMS by accessing location-based information through the use of accessor class methods. However, record store access is critical to any enterprise production application. We’ll briefly cover some of the basics.

In the mainframe era space was at a premium, so the flat file was packed in binary and other formats. As a result, programmers built data-access components that packed and unpacked flat files. The same design principle applies to the somewhat more limited mobile devices that use byte records in a flat-file RMS.

The application needs packing and unpacking functionality to store the GPS byte information in a record store. The packBytes instance method in the RecordDataObjectImpl (see Listing 1) writes the values from the getter methods into a DataOutputStream and then converts the stream to a byte array. The setRecord instance method invokes the packBytes method and adds the bytes to the record store.

One issue with the MIDP record store is which record to pack and unpack. In container-managed persistence, the container automatically generates a findByPrimaryKey instance method for the EJB, which returns the object given by the primary key. The GPS application’s DAO on the mobile device includes a similar instance method denoted as setPrimaryKey. This is an important method because accessing the data by the record ID creates program-data dependence on the storage structure, resulting in a poor design of the record store.

The trick to locating records by the primary key, rather than key index, is to implement the data access object (RecordDataObjectImpl) as a RecordFilter. This allows the use of a RecordEnumeration on the current object to unpack the record bytes for the record that contains the primary key. By invoking the setPrimaryKey method, a RecordEnumeration returns those records (only one) that are true for the match method (see Listing 2). It then unpacks the correct record, giving access to the record information through the accessor methods. This process is invisible to the business object that instantiates RecordDataObjectImpl.

It’s a lot of work to look up and access data from a record store. However, notice that the use of the data access object is almost identical to the CMP entity bean in this GPS application. In a sense, the application uses a MiniEJB entity bean on the mobile device. For example, consider the code fragments in Listing 3. For both the MIDP and EJB code, we create a RecordDataObject and set the primary key to an integer that contains the value of 3. In both cases we invoke the accessor methods. The only difference is that in MIDP we must invoke setRecord, which is primarily needed for efficiency.

Note that in both cases the business object doesn’t need to know the record ID on which it is operating. By using a similar design for the MIDP and EJB process, the code is considerably reduced in the business object layer.

MIDP

com.xspsoft.j2me.db.GpsDataObject gdo = new GpsDataObject();
gdo.setPrimaryKey(new Integer(3));
gdo.setId(new Integer(10));
gdo.setName("Mr. X");
gdo.setRecord();

EJB

com.xspsoft.gps.bean.GpsDataObject gdo = new GpsDataObject();
gdo.getEntityBeanByKey(new Integer(3));
gdo.setId(new Integer(10));
gdo.setName("Mr. X");

XML and Data Binding in J2ME
It’s worth looking into how the SessionMinibean marshals and unmarshals XML data for the transfer of tabular information. Note that the following method for dealing with XML will also be useful for the serialization of Java objects. The lack of MIDP support for RMI will make XML (and SOAP) a critical component for enterprise applications involving J2ME. Therefore, it’s a good idea for the J2ME developer to become proficient in using and manipulating XML.

The SessionMinibean class instance handles the transfer of GPS information between one of the data objects returned by DataObjectFactory and the RootXml and ClientXml objects, which are discussed later. First, we’ll demonstrate how the kXML package from Enhydra can read and write XML from the mobile device to a servlet. To write the <client myName="Mr. X" myLatitude="320854"/> tag to the SOAP servlet requires the following lines of code:

String URI = "http://xspsoft:
8080/xspsoft/SOAP";
HttpConnection ic =
(HttpConnection) Connector.open(URI);
OutputStream os =
ic.openOutputStream();
OutputStreamWriter
writer = new
OutputStream-
Writer(os);
org.kxml.io.XmlWriter w =
new XmlWriter(
(Writer) writer);
w.startTag("client");
w.attribute("myName",
"Mr. X");
w.attribute("myLatitude",
"320854");
w.endTag();
ic.close();

The XmlWriter instance requires a Writer parameter, which can be obtained by wrapping the OutputStream with an OutputStreamWriter. Now, writing to the XmlWriter instance will write directly to the servlet.

Reading from the SOAP servlet is very similar. Consider the following code:

InputStream is = ic.openInputStream();
InputStreamReader reader = new InputStreamReader(is);
XmlReader xr = new XmlReader(reader);
String myName = xr.getValue("myName");
String myLatitude = xr.getValue("myLatitude");
ic.close();

Two classes, ClientXml and RootXml, handle the primary work of marshaling and unmarshaling the data. ClientXml has accessor instance methods to set and get GPS information for the class instance. Consider the marshal method from the ClientXml class:

public void marshal(XmlWriter writer) throws Exception {
XmlWriter w = writer;
w.startTag("client");
w.attribute("id", this.getId().toString());
w.attribute("name", this.name);
w.attribute("latitude", this.getLatitude().toString());
w.attribute("longitude", this.getLongitude().toString());
w.attribute("altitude", this.getAltitude().toString());
w.attribute("speed", this.getSpeed().toString());
w.attribute("direction", this.getDirection().toString());
w.endTag();
}

To write an XML document to the servlet, use the following code:

ClientXml cx = new ClientXml();
cx.setName("Mr. X");
cx.setLatitude(new Integer(327890));
<<more set methods>>
cx.setDirection(new Integer(11));
cx.marshal(anXmlWriter);

The output looks like:

<client name="Mr. X" latitude="327890" ….direction="11"/>

The application can marshal any data access object that implements the IGps interface, which is a two-step process. First, invoke the set methods of a ClientXml instance, passing the return values from the DAO get methods as parameters. Second, invoke the ClientXml marshaling method. The unmarshal instance method is similar and can be viewed in the downloaded code. The purpose of the RootXml class instance is to enumerate through a vector of ClientXml objects, invoking its marshal or unmarshal method. In this specific case the application automatically writes (or reads) a complete XML document that contains multiple rows of clients and their respective locations.

The general case is more interesting. We now have a powerful technique: any object with accessor methods can marshal and unmarshal XML data without ever directly parsing XML data.

Plotting Target Location
MainDriver is the core class that runs the MIDlet application. This section gives a brief overview of the process and shows how all the previous programs fit together. The application starts with the following lines of code:

public void startApp() throws MIDletStateChangeException {
new GpsParserImpl();
GpsPlot gp = new GpsPlot();
display.setCurrent(gp);
}

Invoking the GpsParserImpl constructor begins a thread that starts updating the Coordinate class accessor methods from the GPS receiver. Next we begin another thread by instantiating the GpsPlot inner class. In its constructor, this GpsPlot object starts a TimerTask thread called MiniServlet:

public class MiniServlet extends TimerTask {
public MiniServlet() {
Timer t = new Timer();
t.scheduleAtFixedRate(this, 1000, 10000);
}
public void run() {
SessionMinibean serial = new SessionMinibean("SERIAL");
serial.marshal();
SessionMinibean entity = new SessionMinibean("ENTITY");
entity.unmarshal();
}

MiniServlet schedules its run method to invoke every 10,000 milliseconds. The run method marshals XML data from the Coordinate class to the servlet by invoking serial.marshal(). The servlet then updates the database on the server through the use of JAXB and container-managed persistence.

The run method from MiniServlet then invokes entity.marshal(). This unmarshals XML data from the server database (through the same servlet), updating the CoordinateTarget class accessor methods. In short, we’ve passed our coordinates to the server database and retrieved the target’s coordinates. The target is going through the same process, passing its information to the server and retrieving our GPS information.

The GpsPlot object run method stays alive indefinitely with the following code:

while (true) {
try { Thread.sleep
(100);
repaint();
}
catch
(Exception e){}
}

The repaint method invokes the drawMan method, given below:
1. private void drawMan(Graphics g) {
2. int lt = Coordinate.getLatitude() - CENTER_Y + CENTER_SCREEN;
3. int ln = Coordinate.getLongitude() - CENTER_X + CENTER_SCREEN;
4. int speed = Coordinate.getSpeed();
6. g.fillRect(ln - 2, lt - 4, 4, 4);
7. g.fillRect(ln - 3, lt - 8, 6, 4);
8. g.fillRect(ln - 2, lt - 9, 4, 1);
9. g.fillRect(ln - 1, lt - 10, 2, 1);
10. g.fillRect(ln - 2, lt - 11, 4, 1);
11. g.fillRect(ln - 1, lt - 12, 2, 1);
12. g.fillRect(ln, lt, 2, 2);
14. int deltaLat=Coordinate.getLatitude()- CoordinateTarget.getLatitude();
15. int deltaLong=Coordinate.getLongitude()- CordinateTarget.getLongitude();
16. int distance=com.xspsoft.j2me.util.Math.dist(deltaLat,deltaLong);
18. g.drawString(new String("Speed:"+speed),5,76,Graphics.TOP|Graphics.LEFT);
19. g.drawString(new String("Target Dist: " + distance), 5, 86, 16|4);
20. }

Before the plot is started, the program finds the first latitude and assigns the value to CENTER_Y and the value of the first longitude to CENTER_X. The center of the screen is coordinate pair (50, 50), although this will change depending on the device. On line 2, we calculate the latitude position by invoking the getLatitude method to find the current latitude. Next we subtract the initial latitude. This gives us the latitude movement, centered at zero. We add 50 to center the plot to the middle of the screen. A similar calculation is used for longitude. The fillRect methods plot the pixels that represent a man-shaped figure. As we move, the figure will move from the center coordinate.

We’d also like to display our current speed (lines 4 and 18) and the distance to another target (lines 14–16, 19). Since distance measurements involve square roots, a function not directly supported by the KVM, the download contains a Math class file that handles the distance calculations.

Conclusion
J2ME, J2EE, and XML are helping to end the age of mundane location-based services in the commercial area. The primary advantage is that these technologies open up the location-based services to a larger, more talented pool of developers. Gone are the days when we used our GPS system to ask, “Where is the BurgerBoy exit?” Instead, parents will be tracking their child online or you’ll be locating that elusive friend. As a consequence, your elusive friend will be putting a security perimeter around himself to detect other targets so he can remain elusive.

This article demonstrates a simple application using everyday technologies that allows a user to determine his or her distance from a moving object. Its potential is limitless.

More Stories By Shane Isbell

Shane Isbell works as a software architect at a wireless carrier.

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Most Recent Comments
hLen 08/18/09 11:25:00 AM EDT

I have studied a lot about integrating GPS and J2ME, but I haven´t found a lot of information about it. How can I get the source code? If anyone can send it to my e-mail, I would really apreaciate.

i really need it for my final project,

filipe13andrade 08/07/09 08:24:15 AM EDT

This a very interesting article. I have studied a lot about integrating GPS and J2ME, but I haven´t found a lot of information about it. How can I get the source code? If anyone can send it to my e-mail, I would really apreaciate.

vandawaa 12/15/08 12:43:12 PM EST

This is a great article,I've been search for GPS using J2ME article like this for a long time. But I cannot find the source code. Can you please provide me the source code? If anyone have, can you send it to my email. Thankz.

Ado 03/05/07 11:20:55 AM EST

Hey guys!

Can anyone direct me to some source code that can help me read and extract the direction i am facing when i have a gps connected to a laptop. I need to extarct this information to use in another programming applicatin I am writing.

Any help would be much appreciated!

Raddy 03/18/06 12:54:21 AM EST

Hi Pals,

Check out GPSWatch from www.i10n.com

Its a cool app for interfacing GPS and mobiles using J2ME for lazy heads like me...the product is feature rich with kml exporting, maps, etc. There is even a demo version available I think.

Raddy

Gokce Mutlu 05/03/05 12:06:03 PM EDT

This is a great article but I cannot find the source code. Can you please provide me the source code? If anyone have, can you send it to my email. Thankx.

Shane Isbell 03/17/05 01:31:08 PM EST

Several years ago, I thought that LBS apps would take off more quickly than it has. It was exciting at the time, driving around Walnut Creek, CA as we tracked each other. I had a lot of ideas for extending this application, but it was too tough to make money in the market. At the time, I had also not yet caught the open source bug, so with no commercial work to do, everything finally halted.

If there is enough community interest, I will LGPL the original code and will do further releases on sourceforge. In particular, I would be looking to support JSR-179: Location API for J2ME and to rebuild the server side tracking component, possibly with the use of JXTA. If you are interested or would like to help, e-mail me: random7[at]att[dot]net

Kwame Bryan 02/08/05 01:29:21 PM EST

Glad to see an article of this kind on the Net keep up the great work if you need any help beta-testers developers drop me a line would love to help in any way Cheers Kwame

adhinyano 09/01/03 01:32:20 PM EDT

thank's the source code

Sam 04/24/03 02:00:00 AM EDT

Hi Iam new to JSP, Java Beans. I am able to install all the API and my development environment is ready. Also I created the xspsoft jar file and deployed. Now can anyone tell me how to call this Bean?

Appreciate any help.

Sam

Vinod Warrier 03/28/03 05:34:00 AM EST

Hi Joe,

This is a superb article. Thx for the source code..

Vinod

Ted 03/14/03 11:17:00 PM EST

great article! i'm trying to find some info/sdk for accessing the built-in GPS in the newer cellphones... anyone have any ideas on where to start? i found the location API documentation at sun but i cant find a development kit...

Hector Meneses 02/25/03 04:27:00 PM EST

Hi Joe,

The source code contains only empty files. Could you take a look on this?

Thanks, great article!

Hector

Joe Bowbeer 10/18/02 05:59:00 PM EDT

http://www.sys-con.com/java/source.cfm?id=1360

Joe Bowbeer 10/18/02 05:57:00 PM EDT
Michael Benner 05/17/02 02:06:00 PM EDT

This is a fantastic article and I am interested in looking at the source code, but unfortunately the code is not on the listed webpage. Could you please point me in the right direction to find the source code. Keep up the great work.

David Quintana 03/30/02 04:35:00 PM EST

This is a fantastic article and I am interested in looking at the source code, but unfortunately the code is not on the listed webpage. Could you please point me in the right direction to find the source code. Keep up the great work.

Tar 07/28/03 08:43:00 AM EDT

Hi, I am trying to put the code for this app together . in order to do so can I start with j2me and test it or do I have to put the hole code together j2me and j2ee.
Appreciate the effort to help.
Tar

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Recently, REAN Cloud built a digital concierge for a North Carolina hospital that had observed that most patient call button questions were repetitive. In addition, the paper-based process used to measure patient health metrics was laborious, not in real-time and sometimes error-prone. In their session at 21st Cloud Expo, Sean Finnerty, Executive Director, Practice Lead, Health Care & Life Science at REAN Cloud, and Dr. S.P.T. Krishnan, Principal Architect at REAN Cloud, discussed how they built...
In his session at 21st Cloud Expo, Raju Shreewastava, founder of Big Data Trunk, provided a fun and simple way to introduce Machine Leaning to anyone and everyone. He solved a machine learning problem and demonstrated an easy way to be able to do machine learning without even coding. Raju Shreewastava is the founder of Big Data Trunk (www.BigDataTrunk.com), a Big Data Training and consulting firm with offices in the United States. He previously led the data warehouse/business intelligence and B...
In his Opening Keynote at 21st Cloud Expo, John Considine, General Manager of IBM Cloud Infrastructure, led attendees through the exciting evolution of the cloud. He looked at this major disruption from the perspective of technology, business models, and what this means for enterprises of all sizes. John Considine is General Manager of Cloud Infrastructure Services at IBM. In that role he is responsible for leading IBM’s public cloud infrastructure including strategy, development, and offering m...
With tough new regulations coming to Europe on data privacy in May 2018, Calligo will explain why in reality the effect is global and transforms how you consider critical data. EU GDPR fundamentally rewrites the rules for cloud, Big Data and IoT. In his session at 21st Cloud Expo, Adam Ryan, Vice President and General Manager EMEA at Calligo, examined the regulations and provided insight on how it affects technology, challenges the established rules and will usher in new levels of diligence arou...
The 22nd International Cloud Expo | 1st DXWorld Expo has announced that its Call for Papers is open. Cloud Expo | DXWorld Expo, to be held June 5-7, 2018, at the Javits Center in New York, NY, brings together Cloud Computing, Digital Transformation, Big Data, Internet of Things, DevOps, Machine Learning and WebRTC to one location. With cloud computing driving a higher percentage of enterprise IT budgets every year, it becomes increasingly important to plant your flag in this fast-expanding busin...
Smart cities have the potential to change our lives at so many levels for citizens: less pollution, reduced parking obstacles, better health, education and more energy savings. Real-time data streaming and the Internet of Things (IoT) possess the power to turn this vision into a reality. However, most organizations today are building their data infrastructure to focus solely on addressing immediate business needs vs. a platform capable of quickly adapting emerging technologies to address future ...
No hype cycles or predictions of a gazillion things here. IoT is here. You get it. You know your business and have great ideas for a business transformation strategy. What comes next? Time to make it happen. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Jay Mason, an Associate Partner of Analytics, IoT & Cybersecurity at M&S Consulting, presented a step-by-step plan to develop your technology implementation strategy. He also discussed the evaluation of communication standards and IoT messaging protocols, data...
22nd International Cloud Expo, taking place June 5-7, 2018, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY, and co-located with the 1st DXWorld Expo will feature technical sessions from a rock star conference faculty and the leading industry players in the world. Cloud computing is now being embraced by a majority of enterprises of all sizes. Yesterday's debate about public vs. private has transformed into the reality of hybrid cloud: a recent survey shows that 74% of enterprises have a hybrid cloud ...
22nd International Cloud Expo, taking place June 5-7, 2018, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY, and co-located with the 1st DXWorld Expo will feature technical sessions from a rock star conference faculty and the leading industry players in the world. Cloud computing is now being embraced by a majority of enterprises of all sizes. Yesterday's debate about public vs. private has transformed into the reality of hybrid cloud: a recent survey shows that 74% of enterprises have a hybrid cloud ...
DevOps at Cloud Expo – being held June 5-7, 2018, at the Javits Center in New York, NY – announces that its Call for Papers is open. Born out of proven success in agile development, cloud computing, and process automation, DevOps is a macro trend you cannot afford to miss. From showcase success stories from early adopters and web-scale businesses, DevOps is expanding to organizations of all sizes, including the world's largest enterprises – and delivering real results. Among the proven benefits,...
@DevOpsSummit at Cloud Expo, taking place June 5-7, 2018, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY, is co-located with 22nd Cloud Expo | 1st DXWorld Expo and will feature technical sessions from a rock star conference faculty and the leading industry players in the world. The widespread success of cloud computing is driving the DevOps revolution in enterprise IT. Now as never before, development teams must communicate and collaborate in a dynamic, 24/7/365 environment. There is no time to wait...
Cloud Expo | DXWorld Expo have announced the conference tracks for Cloud Expo 2018. Cloud Expo will be held June 5-7, 2018, at the Javits Center in New York City, and November 6-8, 2018, at the Santa Clara Convention Center, Santa Clara, CA. Digital Transformation (DX) is a major focus with the introduction of DX Expo within the program. Successful transformation requires a laser focus on being data-driven and on using all the tools available that enable transformation if they plan to survive ov...
SYS-CON Events announced today that T-Mobile exhibited at SYS-CON's 20th International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on June 6-8, 2017, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY. As America's Un-carrier, T-Mobile US, Inc., is redefining the way consumers and businesses buy wireless services through leading product and service innovation. The Company's advanced nationwide 4G LTE network delivers outstanding wireless experiences to 67.4 million customers who are unwilling to compromise on qua...
SYS-CON Events announced today that Cedexis will exhibit at SYS-CON's 21st International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on Oct 31 - Nov 2, 2017, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. Cedexis is the leader in data-driven enterprise global traffic management. Whether optimizing traffic through datacenters, clouds, CDNs, or any combination, Cedexis solutions drive quality and cost-effectiveness. For more information, please visit https://www.cedexis.com.
SYS-CON Events announced today that Google Cloud has been named “Keynote Sponsor” of SYS-CON's 21st International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on Oct 31 – Nov 2, 2017, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. Companies come to Google Cloud to transform their businesses. Google Cloud’s comprehensive portfolio – from infrastructure to apps to devices – helps enterprises innovate faster, scale smarter, stay secure, and do more with data than ever before.
SYS-CON Events announced today that Vivint to exhibit at SYS-CON's 21st Cloud Expo, which will take place on October 31 through November 2nd 2017 at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, California. As a leading smart home technology provider, Vivint offers home security, energy management, home automation, local cloud storage, and high-speed Internet solutions to more than one million customers throughout the United States and Canada. The end result is a smart home solution that sav...
SYS-CON Events announced today that Opsani will exhibit at SYS-CON's 21st International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on Oct 31 – Nov 2, 2017, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. Opsani is the leading provider of deployment automation systems for running and scaling traditional enterprise applications on container infrastructure.
SYS-CON Events announced today that Nirmata will exhibit at SYS-CON's 21st International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on Oct 31 – Nov 2, 2017, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. Nirmata provides a comprehensive platform, for deploying, operating, and optimizing containerized applications across clouds, powered by Kubernetes. Nirmata empowers enterprise DevOps teams by fully automating the complex operations and management of application containers and its underlying ...
SYS-CON Events announced today that Opsani to exhibit at SYS-CON's 21st Cloud Expo, which will take place on October 31 through November 2nd 2017 at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, California. Opsani is creating the next generation of automated continuous deployment tools designed specifically for containers. How is continuous deployment different from continuous integration and continuous delivery? CI/CD tools provide build and test. Continuous Deployment is the means by which...