Welcome!

Java IoT Authors: Dana Gardner, Janakiram MSV, Roger Strukhoff, Yeshim Deniz, TJ Randall

Related Topics: Machine Learning , Java IoT, @DevOpsSummit

Machine Learning : Blog Feed Post

In Defense of Java By @AppDynamics | @DevOpsSummit #Java #DevOps

Not only does it remain the most popular programming language, but it may even be increasing its market share

In Defense of Java
By Kevin Goldberg

So we have an eBook, The Top 10 Java Performance Problems, that we tweet out from time to time. Without exception, a few people reply with some version of “the problem is you’re using Java.” Java, apparently, is constantly criticized, and people have been predicting its demise for some time. Sure, it’s not as cool, flexible, or fun as some of the newer, more dynamic languages such as Python, Node.js, or Ruby; however, Java remains an important language for applications everywhere.

Migrating from Java seems like a good scapegoat “quick fix,” but it’s not nearly as simple.

Not only does it remain the most popular programming language (more on this later), but it may even be increasing its market share.

Quick Java History
In 1984, Canadian James Gosling left IBM to join Sun Microsystems as an engineer. While there, Gosling began working on an idea he had thought up while in grad school, programming p-codes in virtual machines. In 1991, Gosling along with two colleagues, Mike Sheridan and Patrick Naughton, began working on the Java language project. They originally referred to the language as Oak, named after a tree outside Gosling’s office, but ultimately settled on Java. I guess a good amount of coffee went into the extensive project influencing the name.

Java was created on five main principles:

  1. Simple, object-oriented, and familiar
  2. Robust and secure
  3. Architecture-neutral and portable
  4. High performance
  5. Interpreted, threaded, and dynamic

In 1995, Java 1.0 was released to the public. Java was initially different because you could compile bytecode and run on all platforms that support Java without the need to reconfigure. This allowed developers to write once and deploy in a myriad of places. The language was also fairly secure and allowed network and file-access restrictions. Needless to say, it quickly took off, especially as Silicon Valley was approaching the first dot-com boom.

Starting in 2006, Sun Microsystems began converting much of the JVM software to open source, appealing to the developer community. However, after Oracle’s 2010 acquisition of Sun Microsystems, the versions of Java were licensed on a commercial basis.

Java’s Popularity
Because of Java’s principles and it’s early market share lead, the majority of large-scale applications were built using Java in some capacity. Typically nowadays, application environments are run on a variety of languages, but still have quite a bit of Java running the foundation.

Okay, so Java had an early lead, but with the rise of newer, better languages it must be declining, right?

Well, yes and no.

There are a few ways (and reports) you can look at measuring the popularity of programming languages. One of the most common and widely used reports is the PYPL PopularitY of Programming Language Index, which is based on Google search trends on language tutorials. In their monthly report, Java ranks #1 followed by Python and PHP.

According to the PYPL, Java has over 24% of market share versus other top languages, more than Python and PHP combined.

Another popular ranking system is TIOBE, which aggregates search engine queries (Google, Yahoo, Bing, Wikipedia, Amazon, and Baidu) and the number of worldwide engineers devoted to each particular language. In their monthly index, Java ranks #1 as well, but this time is followed by C, C++, and C#. What’s interesting to note, though, in this report Java was ranked #2 this time last year. This index seems to indicate Java is actually growing rather than declining which would seem counter-intuitive compared with the general public perception.

In those rankings, both TIOBE and PYPL refer to popularity by the amount of monthly searches each programming language has. However, another way to evaluate popularity is by the demand each coding language has in the job market. After all, new jobs could infer the language use is increasing too.

By analyzing Indeed’s job trends, the growth/decline of Java shows a different story. Though a yearly decline from 2012-2015 is fairly evident, the graph still shows the popularity of Java-related jobs over others. The blue line representing Java is still multiples above the relatively stagnant dynamic languages.

Indeed’s graph also supports the TIOBE rankings by showing Java increased in popularity between 2015 and 2016. Could Java be on the rise?

So What’s Next?
This all started with people responding on Twitter offering their solution of how to fix Java performance problems. Unfortunately, it’s not as easy as ditching Java and moving on. As we’ve shown, Java is still the predominant programming language in the market today, and judging by how you interpret the data, could be increasing too.

If you’re reading this you’re either a Java developer, someone who begrudgingly operates in a Java environment, or one of the clever Twitter jokesters. If you even remotely fit one of those buckets, I encourage you to start where this blog started, by reading our eBook, The Top 10 Java Performance Problems.

The post In Defense of Java appeared first on Application Performance Monitoring Blog | AppDynamics.

Read the original blog entry...

More Stories By AppDynamics Blog

In high-production environments where release cycles are measured in hours or minutes — not days or weeks — there's little room for mistakes and no room for confusion. Everyone has to understand what's happening, in real time, and have the means to do whatever is necessary to keep applications up and running optimally.

DevOps is a high-stakes world, but done well, it delivers the agility and performance to significantly impact business competitiveness.

IoT & Smart Cities Stories
IT professionals are also embracing the reality of Serverless architectures, which are critical to developing and operating real-time applications and services. Serverless is particularly important as enterprises of all sizes develop and deploy Internet of Things (IoT) initiatives. Serverless and Kubernetes are great examples of continuous, rapid pace of change in enterprise IT. They also raise a number of critical issues and questions about employee training, development processes, and opera...
This month @nodexl announced that ServerlessSUMMIT & DevOpsSUMMIT own the world's top three most influential Kubernetes domains which are more influential than LinkedIn, Twitter, YouTube, Medium, Infoworld and Microsoft combined. NodeXL is a template for Microsoft® Excel® (2007, 2010, 2013 and 2016) on Windows (XP, Vista, 7, 8, 10) that lets you enter a network edge list into a workbook, click a button, see a network graph, and get a detailed summary report, all in the familiar environment of...
At CloudEXPO Silicon Valley, June 24-26, 2019, Digital Transformation (DX) is a major focus with expanded DevOpsSUMMIT and FinTechEXPO programs within the DXWorldEXPO agenda. Successful transformation requires a laser focus on being data-driven and on using all the tools available that enable transformation if they plan to survive over the long term. A total of 88% of Fortune 500 companies from a generation ago are now out of business. Only 12% still survive. Similar percentages are found throug...
AI and machine learning disruption for Enterprises started happening in the areas such as IT operations management (ITOPs) and Cloud management and SaaS apps. In 2019 CIOs will see disruptive solutions for Cloud & Devops, AI/ML driven IT Ops and Cloud Ops. Customers want AI-driven multi-cloud operations for monitoring, detection, prevention of disruptions. Disruptions cause revenue loss, unhappy users, impacts brand reputation etc.
At CloudEXPO Silicon Valley, June 24-26, 2019, Digital Transformation (DX) is a major focus with expanded DevOpsSUMMIT and FinTechEXPO programs within the DXWorldEXPO agenda. Successful transformation requires a laser focus on being data-driven and on using all the tools available that enable transformation if they plan to survive over the long term. A total of 88% of Fortune 500 companies from a generation ago are now out of business. Only 12% still survive. Similar percentages are found throug...
Atmosera delivers modern cloud services that maximize the advantages of cloud-based infrastructures. Offering private, hybrid, and public cloud solutions, Atmosera works closely with customers to engineer, deploy, and operate cloud architectures with advanced services that deliver strategic business outcomes. Atmosera's expertise simplifies the process of cloud transformation and our 20+ years of experience managing complex IT environments provides our customers with the confidence and trust tha...
The Japan External Trade Organization (JETRO) is a non-profit organization that provides business support services to companies expanding to Japan. With the support of JETRO's dedicated staff, clients can incorporate their business; receive visa, immigration, and HR support; find dedicated office space; identify local government subsidies; get tailored market studies; and more.
At CloudEXPO Silicon Valley, June 24-26, 2019, Digital Transformation (DX) is a major focus with expanded DevOpsSUMMIT and FinTechEXPO programs within the DXWorldEXPO agenda. Successful transformation requires a laser focus on being data-driven and on using all the tools available that enable transformation if they plan to survive over the long term. A total of 88% of Fortune 500 companies from a generation ago are now out of business. Only 12% still survive. Similar percentages are found throug...
As you know, enterprise IT conversation over the past year have often centered upon the open-source Kubernetes container orchestration system. In fact, Kubernetes has emerged as the key technology -- and even primary platform -- of cloud migrations for a wide variety of organizations. Kubernetes is critical to forward-looking enterprises that continue to push their IT infrastructures toward maximum functionality, scalability, and flexibility. As they do so, IT professionals are also embr...
In his general session at 19th Cloud Expo, Manish Dixit, VP of Product and Engineering at Dice, discussed how Dice leverages data insights and tools to help both tech professionals and recruiters better understand how skills relate to each other and which skills are in high demand using interactive visualizations and salary indicator tools to maximize earning potential. Manish Dixit is VP of Product and Engineering at Dice. As the leader of the Product, Engineering and Data Sciences team at D...