Welcome!

Java IoT Authors: Liz McMillan, Yeshim Deniz, Zakia Bouachraoui, Elizabeth White, William Schmarzo

Related Topics: Java IoT

Java IoT: Article

JDJ Edge 2003 East International Java Conference & Expo

JDJ Edge 2003 East International Java Conference & Expo

(April 4, 2003) - When SYS-CON Events began preparing last year for last month's "Web Services Edge" Conference & Expo, one consideration was paramount: every effort in the 9-month preparation cycle was geared toward making it indisputably the world's largest independent Java, .NET, XML, and Web services event.

That particular mission was accomplished on March 18-20, 2003, at the centrally located Hynes Convention Center in Boston, Massachusetts, when Web Services Edge 2003 East made its mark right from the get-go, with delegates from a wide variety of companies both technologically and geographically. Not only had they been attracted by the specific session tracks for Java, .NET, XML, and Web services, they had also come to take advantage of the all-day i-technology tutorials, whether it was the Sun Microsystems Java University, the IBM XML Certified Developer Fast Path, Russ Fustino's .NET workshop (Russ' Tool Shed), or Derek Ferguson's Mobile .NET tutorial.

The show opened with a very well-attended keynote from Oracle's John Magee, VP of Oracle9i Application Server. Magee stressed that the key to understanding why Web services, unlike its distributed-computing forerunners like COM and CORBA, is prevailing in the enterprise space is that Web services do more than merely enable interoperability between platforms and integration between applications - they also do so simply.

What drives their simplicity, Magee explained to the audience, is standards.

The afternoon keynote offerings on Day One of the conference were equally well received. First came a panel coordinated by the Web Services Interoperability Organization (WS-I). The WS-I is an open industry organization chartered to promote Web services interoperability across platforms, operating systems, and programming languages, and the panel discussion took place against the backdrop of the WS-I Basic Profile 1.0, consisting of a set of nonproprietary Web services specifications. The working draft for this, the audience learned, was approved just four weeks before the conference.

But security, the panel agreed, was the primary priority. Now that corporations like Merrill Lynch and DaimlerChrysler have joined the organization, ensuring that everyone adheres to the same specification is more important than ever. Web services is moving beyond mere SOAP, WSDL, and UDDI toward addressing security, messaging, reliability, and transactions. Eric Newcomer, chief technology officer of IONA Technologies, emphasized the importance of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) approach to these challenges, an effort that centers on the W3C's Web Services Specification Effort.

The Web services keynote panel was quickly followed by the highlight of Day One for many of the delegates gathered in the keynote hall: an address by Miguel de Icaza, the impossibly young and extremely gifted founder and leader of the GNOME Foundation, cofounder of Ximian, Inc., and .NET expert extraordinaire - as anyone needs to be who leads a project designed to port .NET to the Linux operating system.

The Mono Project, as de Icaza's project is called, clearly fascinated the broad mix of developers attending the conference.

After explaining that GNOME - a desktop development platform and suite of productivity applications - is his company's key focus and is mostly developed in C, C++, Python, and Perl, he went on to recount how for every new GNOME API (GNOME is component-oriented and supports many programming languages), GNOME developers needed to develop language-specific bindings. Thus .NET, which also addresses the multilanguage problem, was of immediate interest to de Icaza.

As soon as he learned about the .NET Framework, he told the spellbound audience, he got excited - a single Virtual Execution System for multiple languages, with a large and reusable factored class library, that was, in his view, just what was needed. As well as being a new way to do things, .NET's rich support for interop (COM, P/Invoke) meant you didn't have to rewrite everything all at once.

And so Mono was born: an open-source .NET Framework implementation.

It's based around the CLI ISO standard, de Icaza continued. It has a CLI-compliant execution system and a x86 JIT compiler. It's supported by Windows, BSD, Linux, and Solaris, and there has been lots of progress on the class libraries.

The Windows support, de Icaza said, was merely a function of the fact that 60% or so of Mono developers have a Windows background. Some of the code contributed to Mono was funded by Microsoft grants, he added.

At the end of his keynote address, scores of developers of every stripe got up from their chairs and surrounded de Icaza for further questions. The response to his good humor, rapid delivery, technical savvy, and sheer charm had been overwhelming and with his keynote, Web Services Edge 2003 (East) passed a significant milestone: no previous conference in the series had ever included so wide a range of technical content.

Day Two saw Sun's Mark Herring take the keynote stage and his mastery of the whole Web services paradigm was clearly in evidence. Extended coverage of both his Java keynote and the subsequent keynote address by Jesse Liberty are available on the main conference Web site, www.sys-con.com/WebServicesEdge2003East.

The closing keynote discussion panel, which for many turned out to be the high point of the entire keynote program, was a wide-ranging and a sometimes heated debate about "The Future of Java." The whole intense and highly interactive hour exemplified very well how a SYS-CON i-technology conference program differs from that offered by any other conference organizer. This was panel discussion at its best.

True to the enormously close links that Java Developer's Journal enjoys with the software development industry, the participants in this final panel at Web Services Edge 2003 (East) had come to Boston from far and wide. Sun's chief technology evangelist Simon Phipps had flown over from the UK and BEA's director of technology evangelism Tyler Jewell had traveled from Los Angeles. Sonic Software's VP and chief technology evangelist Dave Chappell may have nipped across from Bedford, MA, but Aligo's CTO Jeff Capone had flown in from San Francisco, and JBoss founder Marc Fleury had come up from the JBoss Group's company's HQ in Atlanta, Georgia.

We fully expect the next Conference & Expo, Web Services Edge (West) in October, to be equally chock-full of the movers and shakers of the software development industry as it continues its headlong progress toward distributed computing with full application integration and interoperability.

All in all it was a marvelous conference, and the Expo hall was intensely busy from the moment it opened to the moment it closed two days later.

This is not the end of the Web services "story," nor is it even the beginning of the end; but March 18-20 in Boston's Hynes Convention Center may well have marked the end of the beginning.

Come join us for Phase Two...in October in California.

More Stories By Jeremy Geelan

Jeremy Geelan is Chairman & CEO of the 21st Century Internet Group, Inc. and an Executive Academy Member of the International Academy of Digital Arts & Sciences. Formerly he was President & COO at Cloud Expo, Inc. and Conference Chair of the worldwide Cloud Expo series. He appears regularly at conferences and trade shows, speaking to technology audiences across six continents. You can follow him on twitter: @jg21.

Comments (0)

Share your thoughts on this story.

Add your comment
You must be signed in to add a comment. Sign-in | Register

In accordance with our Comment Policy, we encourage comments that are on topic, relevant and to-the-point. We will remove comments that include profanity, personal attacks, racial slurs, threats of violence, or other inappropriate material that violates our Terms and Conditions, and will block users who make repeated violations. We ask all readers to expect diversity of opinion and to treat one another with dignity and respect.


IoT & Smart Cities Stories
René Bostic is the Technical VP of the IBM Cloud Unit in North America. Enjoying her career with IBM during the modern millennial technological era, she is an expert in cloud computing, DevOps and emerging cloud technologies such as Blockchain. Her strengths and core competencies include a proven record of accomplishments in consensus building at all levels to assess, plan, and implement enterprise and cloud computing solutions. René is a member of the Society of Women Engineers (SWE) and a m...
Andrew Keys is Co-Founder of ConsenSys Enterprise. He comes to ConsenSys Enterprise with capital markets, technology and entrepreneurial experience. Previously, he worked for UBS investment bank in equities analysis. Later, he was responsible for the creation and distribution of life settlement products to hedge funds and investment banks. After, he co-founded a revenue cycle management company where he learned about Bitcoin and eventually Ethereal. Andrew's role at ConsenSys Enterprise is a mul...
In his general session at 19th Cloud Expo, Manish Dixit, VP of Product and Engineering at Dice, discussed how Dice leverages data insights and tools to help both tech professionals and recruiters better understand how skills relate to each other and which skills are in high demand using interactive visualizations and salary indicator tools to maximize earning potential. Manish Dixit is VP of Product and Engineering at Dice. As the leader of the Product, Engineering and Data Sciences team at D...
Dynatrace is an application performance management software company with products for the information technology departments and digital business owners of medium and large businesses. Building the Future of Monitoring with Artificial Intelligence. Today we can collect lots and lots of performance data. We build beautiful dashboards and even have fancy query languages to access and transform the data. Still performance data is a secret language only a couple of people understand. The more busine...
Nicolas Fierro is CEO of MIMIR Blockchain Solutions. He is a programmer, technologist, and operations dev who has worked with Ethereum and blockchain since 2014. His knowledge in blockchain dates to when he performed dev ops services to the Ethereum Foundation as one the privileged few developers to work with the original core team in Switzerland.
Whenever a new technology hits the high points of hype, everyone starts talking about it like it will solve all their business problems. Blockchain is one of those technologies. According to Gartner's latest report on the hype cycle of emerging technologies, blockchain has just passed the peak of their hype cycle curve. If you read the news articles about it, one would think it has taken over the technology world. No disruptive technology is without its challenges and potential impediments t...
If a machine can invent, does this mean the end of the patent system as we know it? The patent system, both in the US and Europe, allows companies to protect their inventions and helps foster innovation. However, Artificial Intelligence (AI) could be set to disrupt the patent system as we know it. This talk will examine how AI may change the patent landscape in the years to come. Furthermore, ways in which companies can best protect their AI related inventions will be examined from both a US and...
Bill Schmarzo, Tech Chair of "Big Data | Analytics" of upcoming CloudEXPO | DXWorldEXPO New York (November 12-13, 2018, New York City) today announced the outline and schedule of the track. "The track has been designed in experience/degree order," said Schmarzo. "So, that folks who attend the entire track can leave the conference with some of the skills necessary to get their work done when they get back to their offices. It actually ties back to some work that I'm doing at the University of San...
When talking IoT we often focus on the devices, the sensors, the hardware itself. The new smart appliances, the new smart or self-driving cars (which are amalgamations of many ‘things'). When we are looking at the world of IoT, we should take a step back, look at the big picture. What value are these devices providing. IoT is not about the devices, its about the data consumed and generated. The devices are tools, mechanisms, conduits. This paper discusses the considerations when dealing with the...
Bill Schmarzo, author of "Big Data: Understanding How Data Powers Big Business" and "Big Data MBA: Driving Business Strategies with Data Science," is responsible for setting the strategy and defining the Big Data service offerings and capabilities for EMC Global Services Big Data Practice. As the CTO for the Big Data Practice, he is responsible for working with organizations to help them identify where and how to start their big data journeys. He's written several white papers, is an avid blogge...