Welcome!

Java IoT Authors: Liz McMillan, Elizabeth White, Yeshim Deniz, Zakia Bouachraoui, Pat Romanski

Related Topics: @DevOpsSummit, Java IoT, @CloudExpo

@DevOpsSummit: Blog Feed Post

What Infrastructure Should Learn from NPM JavaScript Debacle By @LMacVittie | @DevOpsSummit #DevOps

We can learn a lot from the development organization about how to best go about transitioning to an approach like DevOps

If you hadn’t seen (and you might not have, it was a developer kind of thing after all) there was a big uproar caused by the removal of 11 lines of JavaScript from the popular NPM repository. You can read more about it but the TL;DR is this: dude removed some JavaScript that was relied on by thousands of other projects and basically broke them all. Because those projects not only relied on that code, but relied on code stored in an online repository.

Now before we go further, I have to say that despite the millions (yes, millions) of projects that rely on JavaScript and CSS stored in web-hosted repositories, this is one of the first incidences of something like this happening. And there’s a lot more to this story than just the ramifications. But as I’m not a lawyer (and don’t play one on the Internet nor did I stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night) I’m just going to focus on the impact rather than who is right/wrong/etc… After all, you probably don’t go more than an hour without loading a web app that in turn loads a script from Yahoo or Google or some other online repository so the discussion is really about how relying on online repositories can really mess up your day.

learnWhile this story really hits developers hardest right now, in the future this is something that could impact networkers, so we should talk about it now, rather than in some future post mortem blog.

If we’re going to treat infrastructure as code (and perhaps critical infrastructure, at that) then we need to carefully consider where we’re going to manage the artifacts (templates, scripts, etc…) that make up the metastructure of our modern, automated infrastructure architecture.

First and foremost, we shouldn’t store these on individual creators laptops. Really, if Bob has the most current version of the “deploy critical app A” script and something happens to his system, you’re hosed. If Alice has been vigilantly maintaining the base corporate  security template and malware or an inadvertently hit “delete” key gets rid of it, what do you do? There are a hundred and one different mishaps that could occur that suddenly halt the continuous deployment of an application.

Developers learned that lesson long ago. And to avoid that they moved to network-hosted repositories. Most of them include (or are) version control systems with extra layers of authentication and authorization around them to ensure that only those people (and systems) that should have access, do have access. These are, because of the very nature of storing the corporate secret sauce (application code), usually on-premises. They are replicated, backed-up, and treated with the importance they deserve.

At some point developers started directly grabbing scripts and stylesheets and other dependencies from the web. UI elements and frameworks were automatically included in web apps and downloaded in real time from the web. This had the advantage of making sure they were always up to date. It’s like automagical updates and patching, no work required. And it was good, until one piece of the web was suddenly inaccessible (rarely happens, but it does).

This is much like what recently happened with NPM. A whole lot of other projects depended on one smaller project that was loaded from the web in real time. And when it disappeared, wham! Everything that depended on it being there broke.

If you browse around online repositories of DevOps frameworks like those that host Chef or Puppet fragments, you might find that a lot of them are hosted on Git. Git – and similar systems like Puppet Forge - offer everything you need (including a great API) that would let you pull, in real time, the latest and greatest versions of these infrastructure-related artifacts. Right into your CI/CD process. Cause you are extending that to your (network and app service) infrastructure, right?

This is where we need to stop, take a deep breath, and consider we might not want to do that directly.

Git – and similar systems – also offer local repository support, with the ability to synchronize with the “central” repository online. Yes, that means another piece of infrastructure you have to install, manage, and maintain locally, but if you consider that you’re not only worried about availability but also the potential for an update to “break” your process, you really want to think about this now, rather than later.

I wholly recommend the use of version controlled repositories as you’re embarking on this journey to transform the network (all of it) into a more agile and automated environment. Treating infrastructure as code can make roll-backs and replacements a whole lot easier to manage if the latest and greatest configurations can just be pulled out of a controlled repository. But that controlled repository should be just that: controlled. It should be local to the environment because otherwise it’s not controlled at all. Not really. Availability issues, unexpected changes, or outright removal of dependencies are a risk that should be considered well in advance of implementing the system.

One of the hardest cultural impacts that will be wrought on networking by shifting left (into the CI/CD process) will be the need to implement the kinds of controls and processes on changes to infrastructure as are currently expected on the app code itself. Code reviews, version control, and the use of repositories will be mandatory in the future if we’re to actually treat infrastructure as code. That’s a marked difference from right now, where scripts and artifacts may or may not be required to submit to a review / approval process, and where the latest artifacts are often stored “on that server” or “on Bob’s laptop.”

The good news is that developers have suffered through this journey already. We can learn a lot from the development organization about how to best go about transitioning to an approach like DevOps that treats infrastructure as code. Don’t let their lessons go to waste.

Read the original blog entry...

More Stories By Lori MacVittie

Lori MacVittie is responsible for education and evangelism of application services available across F5’s entire product suite. Her role includes authorship of technical materials and participation in a number of community-based forums and industry standards organizations, among other efforts. MacVittie has extensive programming experience as an application architect, as well as network and systems development and administration expertise. Prior to joining F5, MacVittie was an award-winning Senior Technology Editor at Network Computing Magazine, where she conducted product research and evaluation focused on integration with application and network architectures, and authored articles on a variety of topics aimed at IT professionals. Her most recent area of focus included SOA-related products and architectures. She holds a B.S. in Information and Computing Science from the University of Wisconsin at Green Bay, and an M.S. in Computer Science from Nova Southeastern University.

IoT & Smart Cities Stories
@CloudEXPO and @ExpoDX, two of the most influential technology events in the world, have hosted hundreds of sponsors and exhibitors since our launch 10 years ago. @CloudEXPO and @ExpoDX New York and Silicon Valley provide a full year of face-to-face marketing opportunities for your company. Each sponsorship and exhibit package comes with pre and post-show marketing programs. By sponsoring and exhibiting in New York and Silicon Valley, you reach a full complement of decision makers and buyers in ...
Two weeks ago (November 3-5), I attended the Cloud Expo Silicon Valley as a speaker, where I presented on the security and privacy due diligence requirements for cloud solutions. Cloud security is a topical issue for every CIO, CISO, and technology buyer. Decision-makers are always looking for insights on how to mitigate the security risks of implementing and using cloud solutions. Based on the presentation topics covered at the conference, as well as the general discussions heard between sessio...
While the focus and objectives of IoT initiatives are many and diverse, they all share a few common attributes, and one of those is the network. Commonly, that network includes the Internet, over which there isn't any real control for performance and availability. Or is there? The current state of the art for Big Data analytics, as applied to network telemetry, offers new opportunities for improving and assuring operational integrity. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Jim Frey, Vice President of S...
In his keynote at 18th Cloud Expo, Andrew Keys, Co-Founder of ConsenSys Enterprise, provided an overview of the evolution of the Internet and the Database and the future of their combination – the Blockchain. Andrew Keys is Co-Founder of ConsenSys Enterprise. He comes to ConsenSys Enterprise with capital markets, technology and entrepreneurial experience. Previously, he worked for UBS investment bank in equities analysis. Later, he was responsible for the creation and distribution of life settl...
The Internet of Things is clearly many things: data collection and analytics, wearables, Smart Grids and Smart Cities, the Industrial Internet, and more. Cool platforms like Arduino, Raspberry Pi, Intel's Galileo and Edison, and a diverse world of sensors are making the IoT a great toy box for developers in all these areas. In this Power Panel at @ThingsExpo, moderated by Conference Chair Roger Strukhoff, panelists discussed what things are the most important, which will have the most profound e...
The Jevons Paradox suggests that when technological advances increase efficiency of a resource, it results in an overall increase in consumption. Writing on the increased use of coal as a result of technological improvements, 19th-century economist William Stanley Jevons found that these improvements led to the development of new ways to utilize coal. In his session at 19th Cloud Expo, Mark Thiele, Chief Strategy Officer for Apcera, compared the Jevons Paradox to modern-day enterprise IT, examin...
Rodrigo Coutinho is part of OutSystems' founders' team and currently the Head of Product Design. He provides a cross-functional role where he supports Product Management in defining the positioning and direction of the Agile Platform, while at the same time promoting model-based development and new techniques to deliver applications in the cloud.
There are many examples of disruption in consumer space – Uber disrupting the cab industry, Airbnb disrupting the hospitality industry and so on; but have you wondered who is disrupting support and operations? AISERA helps make businesses and customers successful by offering consumer-like user experience for support and operations. We have built the world’s first AI-driven IT / HR / Cloud / Customer Support and Operations solution.
LogRocket helps product teams develop better experiences for users by recording videos of user sessions with logs and network data. It identifies UX problems and reveals the root cause of every bug. LogRocket presents impactful errors on a website, and how to reproduce it. With LogRocket, users can replay problems.
Data Theorem is a leading provider of modern application security. Its core mission is to analyze and secure any modern application anytime, anywhere. The Data Theorem Analyzer Engine continuously scans APIs and mobile applications in search of security flaws and data privacy gaps. Data Theorem products help organizations build safer applications that maximize data security and brand protection. The company has detected more than 300 million application eavesdropping incidents and currently secu...