Click here to close now.



Welcome!

Java IoT Authors: Jnan Dash, Scott Allen, Bob Gourley, Dana Gardner, Pat Romanski

Related Topics: Java IoT

Java IoT: Article

Java Streams Basics

Lesson 5

Most of the programs work with external data stored either in local files or coming from other computers on the network. Java has a concept of working with so-called streams of data. After a physical data storage is mapped to a logical stream, a Java program reads data from this stream serially - byte after byte, character after character, etc. Some of the types of streams are byte streams (InputStream, OutputStream) and character streams (Reader and Writer). The same physical file could be read using different types of streams, for example, FileInputStream, or FileReader.

Classes that work with streams are located in the package java.io. Java 1.4 has introduced the new package java.nio with improved performance, which is not covered in this lesson.

There are different types of data, and hence different types of streams.

Here's the sequence of steps needed to work with a stream:

  1. Open a stream that points at a specific data source: a file, a socket, URL, etc.
  2. Read or write data from/to this stream.
  3. Close the stream.

Let's have a closer look at some of the Java streams.

Byte Streams

If a program needs to read/write bytes (8-bit data), it could use one of the subclasses of the InputStream or OutputStream respectively. The example below shows how to use the class FileInputStream to read a file named abc.dat. This code snippet prints each byte's value separated with white spaces. Byte values are represented by integers from 0 to 255, and if the read() method returns -1, this indicates the end of the stream.

import java.io.FileInputStream;
import java.io.IOException;
public class ReadingBytes {
public static void main(String[] args) {  FileInputStream myFile = null;  try {
  myFile = new FileInputStream("c:\\abc.dat");  // open the  stream
  boolean eof = false;
   while (!eof) {
    int byteValue = myFile.read();  // read  the stream
    System.out.println(byteValue);
    if (byteValue  == -1){
    eof = true;
    }
    //myFile.close();  // do not do it here!!!
   }
  }catch (IOException e) {
      System.out.println("Could not read file: " + e.toString());
  } finally{
   try{
     if (myFile!=null){
       myFile.close(); // close the stream
     }
   } catch (Exception e1){
    e1.printStackTrace();
   }
  }
 }
}

Please note that the stream is closed in the clause finally. Do not call the method close() inside of the try/catch block right after the file reading is done. In case of exception during the file read, the program would jump over the close() statement and the stream would never be closed!

The next code fragment writes into the file xyz.dat using the class FileOutputStream:

int somedata[]={56,230,123,43,11,37};
FileOutputStream myFile = null;
try {
  myFile = new  FileOutputStream("c:\xyz.dat");
  for (int i = 0; i <somedata.length;I++){
      myFile.write(data[I]);
  }
} catch (IOException e)
      System.out.println("Could not write to a file: " + e.toString()); }
finally
    // Close the file the same way as in example above }

Buffered Streams

So far we were reading and writing one byte at a time. Disk access is much slower than the processing performed in memory. That's why it's not a good idea to access disk 1000 times for reading a file of 1000 bytes. To minimize the number of time the disk is accessed, Java provides buffers, which are sort of "reservoirs of data". For example, the class BufferedInputStream works as a middleman between the FileInputStream and the file itself. It reads a big chunk of bytes from a file in one shot into memory, and, then the FileInputStream will read single bytes from there. The BufferedOutputStream works in a similar manner with the class FileOutputStream. Buffered streams just make reading more efficient.

You can use stream chaining (or stream piping) to connect streams - think of connecting two pipes in plumbing. Let's modify the example that reads the file abc.dat to introduce the buffering:

FileInputStream myFile = null;
BufferedInputStream buff =null
try {
  myFile = new  FileInputStream("abc.dat");
  BufferedInputStream buff = new BufferedInputStream(myFile);
  boolean eof = false;
  while (!eof) {
    int byteValue = buff.read();
    System.out.print(byteValue + " ");
    if (byteValue  == -1)
      eof = true;
  }
} catch (IOException e) {
  e.printStackTrace();
} finally{
  buff.close();
  myFile.close();
}

It's a good practice to call the method flush() when the writing into a BufferedOutputStream is done - this forces any buffered data to be written out to the underlying output stream.

While the default buffer size varies depending on the OS, it could be controlled. For example, to set the buffer size to 5000 bytes do this:

BufferedInputStream buff = new BufferedInputStream(myFile, 5000);

Character Streams

Java uses two-byte characters to represent text data, and the classes FileReader and FileWriter work with text files. These classes allow you to read files either one character at a time with read(), or one line at a time with readLine().

The classes FileReader and FileWriter also support have buffering with the help of BufferedReader and BufferedWriter. The following example reads text one line at a time:

FileReader myFile = null;
BufferedReader buff = null;
try {
  myFile = new FileReader("abc.txt");
  buff = new BufferedReader(myFile);
  boolean eof = false;
  while (!eof) {
    String line = buff.readLine();
    if (line == null)
      eof = true;
    else
      System.out.println(line);
    }
    ....
}

For the text output, there are several overloaded methods write() that allow you to write one character, one String or an array of characters at a time.

To append data to an existing file while writing, use the 2-arguments constructor (the second argument toggles the append mode):

FileWriter fOut = new FileWriter("xyz.txt", true);

Below is yet another version of the tax calculation program (see the lesson Intro to Object-Oriented Programming with Java). This is a Swing version of the program and it populates the populate the dropdown box chState with the data from the text file states.txt.

import java.awt.event.*;
import java.awt.*;
import java.io.FileReader;
import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.IOException;

public class TaxFrameFile extends java.awt.Frame implements ActionListener {
  Label lblGrIncome;
  TextField txtGrossIncome = new TextField(15);
  Label lblDependents=new Label("Number of Dependents:");
  TextField txtDependents = new TextField(2);
  Label lblState = new Label("State: ");
  Choice chState = new Choice();

  Label lblTax = new Label("State Tax: ");
  TextField txtStateTax = new TextField(10);
  Button bGo = new Button("Go");
  Button bReset = new Button("Reset");

  TaxFrameFile() {
    lblGrIncome = new Label("Gross Income: ");
    GridLayout gr = new GridLayout(5,2,1,1);
    setLayout(gr);

    add(lblGrIncome);
    add(txtGrossIncome);
    add(lblDependents);
    add(txtDependents);
    add(lblState);
    add(chState);
    add(lblTax);
    add(txtStateTax);
    add(bGo);
    add(bReset);

    // Populate states from a file
    populateStates();
    txtStateTax.setEditable(false);

    bGo.addActionListener(this);
    bReset.addActionListener(this);

    // Define, instantiate and register a WindowAdapter
    // to process windowClosing Event of this frame

       this.addWindowListener(new WindowAdapter() {
        public void windowClosing(WindowEvent e) {
                           System.out.println("Good bye!");
            System.exit(0);
        }});
    }

    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent evt) {
       Object source = evt.getSource();
        if (source == bGo ){
           // The Button Go processing
             try{
               int grossInc =
                Integer.parseInt(txtGrossIncome.getText());
               int dependents   =
                 Integer.parseInt(txtDependents.getText());
               String state = chState.getSelectedItem();

               Tax tax=new Tax(dependents,state,grossInc);
               String sTax =
                       Double.toString(tax.calcStateTax());
               txtStateTax.setText(sTax);
             }catch(NumberFormatException e){
                 txtStateTax.setText("Non-Numeric Data");
             }catch (Exception e){
                txtStateTax.setText(e.getMessage());
             }
         }
         else if (source == bReset ){
            // The Button Reset processing
        txtGrossIncome.setText("");
        txtDependents.setText("");
                          chState.select("  ");
        txtStateTax.setText("");
             }
    }
   // This method will read the file states.txt and  
   // populate the dropdown chStates
    private void populateStates(){
      FileReader myFile = null;
      BufferedReader buff = null;
        try {
            myFile = new FileReader("states.txt");
            buff = new BufferedReader(myFile);

            boolean eof = false;
            while (!eof) {
                String line = buff.readLine();
                if (line == null)
                   eof = true;
                else
                   chState.add(line);
         }
        }catch (IOException e){
           txtStateTax.setText("Can't read states.txt");
       }
       finally{
         // Closing the streams
         try{
            buff.close();
            myFile.close();
         }catch(IOException e){
            e.printStackTrace();
         }
       }
    }

    public static void main(String args[]){
       TaxFrameFile taxFrame = new TaxFrameFile();
       taxFrame.setSize(400,150);
       taxFrame.setVisible(true);
    }
}

Data Streams

If you are expecting to work with a stream of a known data structure, i.e. two integers, three floats and a double, use either the DataInputStream or the DataOutputStream. A method call readInt() will read the whole integer number (4 bytes ) at once, and the readLong() will get you a long number (8 bytes).

The DataInput stream is just a filter. We are building a "pipe" from the following fragments:

FileInputStream --> BufferedInputStream --> DataInputStream

FileInputStream myFile = new FileInputStream("myData.dat");
BufferedInputStream buff = new BufferedInputStream(myFile);
DataInputStream data = new  DataInputStream(buff);

try {
   int num1 = data.readInt();
   int num2 = data.readInt();
   float num2 = data.readFloat();
   float num3 = data.readFloat();
   float num4 = data.readFloat();
   double num5 = data.readDouble();
} catch (EOFException eof) {...}

Class StreamTokenizer

Sometimes you need to parse a stream without knowing in advance what data types you are getting. In this case you want to get each "piece of data" (token) based on the fact that a delimiter such as a space, comma, etc separates the data elements.

The class java.io.StreamTokenizer reads tokens one at a time. It can recognize identifiers, numbers, quoted strings, etc. Typically an application creates an instance of this class, sets up the rules for parsing, and then repeatedly calls the method nextToken() until it returns the value TT_EOF (end of file).

Let's write a program that will read and parse the file customers.txt distinguishing strings from numbers.

Suppose we have a file customers.txt with the following content:

John Smith  50.24
Mary Lou  234.29
Alexander Popandopula  456.11

Here is the program that parses it:

import java.io.StreamTokenizer;
import java.io.FileReader;

public class CustomerTokenizer{
  public static void main(String args[]){

  StreamTokenizer stream =null;
  try{
    stream = new StreamTokenizer( new
                            FileReader("customers.txt"));
    while (true) {

         int token = stream.nextToken();
         if (token == StreamTokenizer.TT_EOF)
             break;
         if (token == StreamTokenizer.TT_WORD) {
             System.out.println("Got the string: " +
                                         stream.sval);
             }
         if (token == StreamTokenizer.TT_NUMBER) {
             System.out.println("Got the number: " +
                                         stream.nval);
             }
        }
      }catch (Exception e){
         System.out.println("Can't read Customers.txt: " +
                                             e.toString());
      }
      finally{
          try{
             stream.close();
          }catch(Exception e){e.printStackTrace();}          
      }
   }
}

After compiling and running the program CustomerTokenizer, the system console will look like this:

javac CustomerTokenizer.java

java CustomerTokenizer

Got the string: John
Got the string: Smith
Got the number: 50.24
Got the string: Mary
Got the string: Lou
Got the number: 234.29
Got the string: Alexander
Got the string: Popandopula
Got the number: 456.11

When a StreamTokenizer finds a word, it places the value into the sval member variable, and the numbers are placed into the variable nval.

You can specify characters that should be treated as delimiters by calling the method whitespaceChars(). The characters that represent quotes in the stream are set by calling the method quoteChar().

To make sure that certain characters are not misinterpreted, call a method ordinaryChar(), for example ordinaryChar('/');

Class StringTokenizer

The class java.util.StringTokenizer is a simpler version of a class StreamTokenizer, but it works only with strings. The set of delimiters could be specified at the creation time, i.e. comma and angle brackets:

StringTokenizer st = new StringTokenizer(
              "Yakov, 12 Main St., New York", ",<>");
while (st.hasMoreTokens()) {
    System.out.println(st.nextToken());
}

The above code fragment would print the following:

HTML
Yakov
12 Main St.
New York

The previous sample would not return the value of a delimiter - it just returned the tokens. But sometimes, in case of multiple delimiters, you may want to know what's the current delimiter. The 3-argument constructor will provide this information. The following example defines 4 delimiters: greater and less then signs, comma and a white space:

StringTokenizer st=new StringTokenizer( "...IBM...price<...>86.3", "<>, ", true);

If the third argument is true, delimiter characters are also considered to be tokens and will be returned to the calling method, so a program may apply different logic based on the delimiter. If you decide to parse HTML file, you'll need to know what's the current delimiter to apply the proper logic.

Class File

This class has a number of useful file maintenance methods that allow rename, delete, perform existence check, etc. First you have to create an instance of this class:

File myFile = new File("abc.txt");

The line above does not actually create a file - it just creates an instance of the class File that is ready to perform some manipulations with the file abc.txt.The method createNewFile() should be used for the actual creation of the file.

Below are some useful methods of the class File:

   1. createNewFile()creates a new, empty file named according to the file name used during the File instantiation. It creates a new file only if a file with this name does not exist
   2. delete() deletes file or directory
   3. renameTo() renames a file
   4. length() returns the length of the file in bytes
   5. exists() tests whether the file with specified name exists
   6. list() returns an array of strings naming the files and directories in the specified directory
   7. lastModified() returns the time that the file was last modified
   8. mkDir() creates a directory

The code below creates a renames a file customers.txt to customers.txt.bak. If a file with such name already exists, it will be overwritten.

File file = new File("customers.txt");
File backup = new File("customers.txt.bak");
if (backup.exists()){
 backup.delete();
}
file.renameTo(backup);

More Stories By Yakov Fain

Yakov Fain is a co-founder of two software companies: Farata Systems and SuranceBay. He authored several technical books and lots of articles on software development. Yakov is Java Champion (https://java-champions.java.net). He leads leads Princeton Java Users Group. Two of Yakov's books will go in print this year: "Enterprise Web Development" (O'Reilly) and "Java For Kids" (No Starch Press).

Comments (13) View Comments

Share your thoughts on this story.

Add your comment
You must be signed in to add a comment. Sign-in | Register

In accordance with our Comment Policy, we encourage comments that are on topic, relevant and to-the-point. We will remove comments that include profanity, personal attacks, racial slurs, threats of violence, or other inappropriate material that violates our Terms and Conditions, and will block users who make repeated violations. We ask all readers to expect diversity of opinion and to treat one another with dignity and respect.


Most Recent Comments
Frederik De Milde 02/06/05 04:41:46 PM EST

A little bug in your code snippet on Buffering: buff shouldn't be declared twice...

FileInputStream myFile = null;
BufferedInputStream buff =null
try {
myFile = new FileInputStream("abc.dat");
BufferedInputStream buff = new BufferedInputStream(myFile);
boolean eof = false;
while (!eof) {
int byteValue = buff.read();
System.out.print(byteValue + " ");
if (byteValue == -1)
eof = true;
}
} catch (IOException e) {
e.printStackTrace();
} finally{
buff.close();
myFile.close();
}

Muiris O Cleirigh 03/29/04 04:26:47 AM EST

There seems to be a problem rendering this article - this part doesn''t make a lot of sense to me ......

The next code fragment writes into the file xyz.dat using the class FileOutputStream:

int somedata[]={56,230,123,43,11,37};
FileOutputStream myFile = null;
try {
myFile = new FileOutputStream("xyz.dat");
for (int i = 0; i
You can use stream chaining (or stream piping) to connect streams - think of connecting two pipes in plumbing.
Let''s modify the example that reads the file abc.dat to introduce the buffering:

FileInputStream myFile = null;
BufferedInputStream buff =null
try {
myFile = new FileInputStream("abc.dat");
BufferedInputStream buff = new BufferedInputStream(myFile);
boolean eof = false;
while (!eof) {
int byteValue = buff.read();
System.out.print(byteValue + " ");
if (byteValue == -1)
eof = true;
}
} catch (IOException e) {
e.printStackTrace();
} finally{
buff.close();
myFile.close();
}

Greg Nudelman 01/07/04 12:05:29 PM EST

Excellent article. This has got to be one of the best Stream tutorials out there. I''m also very impressed with your coverage of the StreamTokenizer -- this is an "esoteric" class that few people know and understand how to use effectively. I''m also very impressed with a nice concise run-down of the File class features, such as directory management. Again, excellent article. Keep up the good work!

Greg

michael turner 01/07/04 11:00:34 AM EST

This was a good summarization of Java Stream Basics. I have retained sections of the article for Reference. Thank you for presenting the information

Yakov Fain 01/07/04 10:48:56 AM EST

Sorry, the FileReader should have been closed:

import java.io.StreamTokenizer;
import java.io.FileReader;

public class CustomerTokenizer{
public static void main(String args[]){

StreamTokenizer stream =null;
FileReader fr=null;
try{
fr = new FileReader("customers.txt");
stream = new StreamTokenizer(fr );
while (true) {

int token = stream.nextToken();
if (token == StreamTokenizer.TT_EOF)
break;
if (token == StreamTokenizer.TT_WORD) {
System.out.println("Got the string: " +
stream.sval);
}
if (token == StreamTokenizer.TT_NUMBER) {
System.out.println("Got the number: " +
stream.nval);
}
}
}catch (Exception e){
System.out.println("Can''t read Customers.txt: " +
e.toString());
}
finally{
try{
fr.close();
}catch(Exception e){e.printStackTrace();}
}
}
}

thomas harris 01/07/04 09:50:54 AM EST

I tried to compile the CustomerTokenizer class and came up with the following error:

File: C:\java\test\CustomerTokenizer.java [line: 33]
Error: cannot resolve symbol
symbol : method close ()
location: class java.io.StreamTokenizer

I checked the api, and the close() method is available via java.io.FileReader so I am not clear on why I got the above error message. Is the compiler looking for the method in the wrong class?

Yakov Fain 01/07/04 09:19:31 AM EST

One of ther readers asked me the questions listed below, and I decided to publish the answers over here as well.

What is the reason for a buffered reader and buffered
writer--what is the need for buffering?

Buffering allows you to read a bunch of bytes from disk into the buffer in one shot, and then the program gets the data from the buffer from the memory byte by byte, int by int, etc. This minimizes the number of times your program has to access the disk.

StreamTokenizer does not have a close method. How do
you close a Stream Tokenizer?

The StreamTokenizer is not a stream itself - it does not need to be closed.

Andrey Postoyanets 01/06/04 05:22:20 PM EST

So far the style of this lessons series has been outstanding. Nothing can be more valuable than informative, easy-to-follow examples with a clear explanation.
I also agree that the usage of Java streams and XML manipulation would be a great topic for one of the future articles.

Matt Campbell 01/06/04 03:54:37 PM EST

LOL!

Steve Krenz 01/06/04 03:22:36 PM EST

What''s VB ;-)

Matt Campbell 01/06/04 02:31:39 PM EST

You know, it still isn''t nearly as easy as getting a stream of chars by line or a whole file for parsing as it is in VB. :)

Steven Krenz 01/06/04 11:27:03 AM EST

Good article as far as it goes but what would be much more helpful would be a discussion of how readers differ from and are built on streams. What I always find difficult to remember is the best way to read a whole line of data from a stream and not just characters. The connection between java.io streams and org.xml.sax.InputStream is what I suspect most developers are concerned about right now.

Warawich Sundarabhaka 01/05/04 10:50:38 PM EST

very good lesson and example.

@ThingsExpo Stories
Most people haven’t heard the word, “gamification,” even though they probably, and perhaps unwittingly, participate in it every day. Gamification is “the process of adding games or game-like elements to something (as a task) so as to encourage participation.” Further, gamification is about bringing game mechanics – rules, constructs, processes, and methods – into the real world in an effort to engage people. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Robert Endo, owner and engagement manager of Intrepid D...
With an estimated 50 billion devices connected to the Internet by 2020, several industries will begin to expand their capabilities for retaining end point data at the edge to better utilize the range of data types and sheer volume of M2M data generated by the Internet of Things. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Don DeLoach, CEO and President of Infobright, will discuss the infrastructures businesses will need to implement to handle this explosion of data by providing specific use cases for filte...
SYS-CON Events announced today that Fusion, a leading provider of cloud services, will exhibit at SYS-CON's 18th International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on June 7-9, 2016, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY. Fusion, a leading provider of integrated cloud solutions to small, medium and large businesses, is the industry's single source for the cloud. Fusion's advanced, proprietary cloud service platform enables the integration of leading edge solutions in the cloud, including clou...
SYS-CON Events announced today that Commvault, a global leader in enterprise data protection and information management, has been named “Bronze Sponsor” of SYS-CON's 18th International Cloud Expo, which will take place on June 7–9, 2016, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY, and the 19th International Cloud Expo, which will take place on November 1–3, 2016, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. Commvault is a leading provider of data protection and information management...
SYS-CON Events announced today that Alert Logic, Inc., the leading provider of Security-as-a-Service solutions for the cloud, will exhibit at SYS-CON's 18th International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on June 7-9, 2016, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY. Alert Logic, Inc., provides Security-as-a-Service for on-premises, cloud, and hybrid infrastructures, delivering deep security insight and continuous protection for customers at a lower cost than traditional security solutions. Ful...
SYS-CON Events announced today that VAI, a leading ERP software provider, will exhibit at SYS-CON's 18th International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on June 7-9, 2016, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY. VAI (Vormittag Associates, Inc.) is a leading independent mid-market ERP software developer renowned for its flexible solutions and ability to automate critical business functions for the distribution, manufacturing, specialty retail and service sectors. An IBM Premier Business Part...
The cloud promises new levels of agility and cost-savings for Big Data, data warehousing and analytics. But it’s challenging to understand all the options – from IaaS and PaaS to newer services like HaaS (Hadoop as a Service) and BDaaS (Big Data as a Service). In her session at @BigDataExpo at @ThingsExpo, Hannah Smalltree, a director at Cazena, will provide an educational overview of emerging “as-a-service” options for Big Data in the cloud. This is critical background for IT and data profes...
Fortunately, meaningful and tangible business cases for IoT are plentiful in a broad array of industries and vertical markets. These range from simple warranty cost reduction for capital intensive assets, to minimizing downtime for vital business tools, to creating feedback loops improving product design, to improving and enhancing enterprise customer experiences. All of these business cases, which will be briefly explored in this session, hinge on cost effectively extracting relevant data from ...
As enterprises work to take advantage of Big Data technologies, they frequently become distracted by product-level decisions. In most new Big Data builds this approach is completely counter-productive: it presupposes tools that may not be a fit for development teams, forces IT to take on the burden of evaluating and maintaining unfamiliar technology, and represents a major up-front expense. In his session at @BigDataExpo at @ThingsExpo, Andrew Warfield, CTO and Co-Founder of Coho Data, will dis...
With the Apple Watch making its way onto wrists all over the world, it’s only a matter of time before it becomes a staple in the workplace. In fact, Forrester reported that 68 percent of technology and business decision-makers characterize wearables as a top priority for 2015. Recognizing their business value early on, FinancialForce.com was the first to bring ERP to wearables, helping streamline communication across front and back office functions. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Kevin Roberts...
SYS-CON Events announced today that Interoute, owner-operator of one of Europe's largest networks and a global cloud services platform, has been named “Bronze Sponsor” of SYS-CON's 18th Cloud Expo, which will take place on June 7-9, 2015 at the Javits Center in New York, New York. Interoute is the owner-operator of one of Europe's largest networks and a global cloud services platform which encompasses 12 data centers, 14 virtual data centers and 31 colocation centers, with connections to 195 ad...
Eighty percent of a data scientist’s time is spent gathering and cleaning up data, and 80% of all data is unstructured and almost never analyzed. Cognitive computing, in combination with Big Data, is changing the equation by creating data reservoirs and using natural language processing to enable analysis of unstructured data sources. This is impacting every aspect of the analytics profession from how data is mined (and by whom) to how it is delivered. This is not some futuristic vision: it's ha...
WebRTC has had a real tough three or four years, and so have those working with it. Only a few short years ago, the development world were excited about WebRTC and proclaiming how awesome it was. You might have played with the technology a couple of years ago, only to find the extra infrastructure requirements were painful to implement and poorly documented. This probably left a bitter taste in your mouth, especially when things went wrong.
Learn how IoT, cloud, social networks and last but not least, humans, can be integrated into a seamless integration of cooperative organisms both cybernetic and biological. This has been enabled by recent advances in IoT device capabilities, messaging frameworks, presence and collaboration services, where devices can share information and make independent and human assisted decisions based upon social status from other entities. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Michael Heydt, founder of Seamless...
The IoT's basic concept of collecting data from as many sources possible to drive better decision making, create process innovation and realize additional revenue has been in use at large enterprises with deep pockets for decades. So what has changed? In his session at @ThingsExpo, Prasanna Sivaramakrishnan, Solutions Architect at Red Hat, discussed the impact commodity hardware, ubiquitous connectivity, and innovations in open source software are having on the connected universe of people, thi...
WebRTC: together these advances have created a perfect storm of technologies that are disrupting and transforming classic communications models and ecosystems. In his session at WebRTC Summit, Cary Bran, VP of Innovation and New Ventures at Plantronics and PLT Labs, provided an overview of this technological shift, including associated business and consumer communications impacts, and opportunities it may enable, complement or entirely transform.
There are so many tools and techniques for data analytics that even for a data scientist the choices, possible systems, and even the types of data can be daunting. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Chris Harrold, Global CTO for Big Data Solutions for EMC Corporation, showed how to perform a simple, but meaningful analysis of social sentiment data using freely available tools that take only minutes to download and install. Participants received the download information, scripts, and complete end-t...
For manufacturers, the Internet of Things (IoT) represents a jumping-off point for innovation, jobs, and revenue creation. But to adequately seize the opportunity, manufacturers must design devices that are interconnected, can continually sense their environment and process huge amounts of data. As a first step, manufacturers must embrace a new product development ecosystem in order to support these products.
Manufacturing connected IoT versions of traditional products requires more than multiple deep technology skills. It also requires a shift in mindset, to realize that connected, sensor-enabled “things” act more like services than what we usually think of as products. In his session at @ThingsExpo, David Friedman, CEO and co-founder of Ayla Networks, discussed how when sensors start generating detailed real-world data about products and how they’re being used, smart manufacturers can use the dat...
When it comes to IoT in the enterprise, namely the commercial building and hospitality markets, a benefit not getting the attention it deserves is energy efficiency, and IoT’s direct impact on a cleaner, greener environment when installed in smart buildings. Until now clean technology was offered piecemeal and led with point solutions that require significant systems integration to orchestrate and deploy. There didn't exist a 'top down' approach that can manage and monitor the way a Smart Buildi...