Welcome!

Java IoT Authors: Zakia Bouachraoui, Liz McMillan, Kevin Benedict, Elizabeth White, Yeshim Deniz

Related Topics: Java IoT

Java IoT: Article

Java Viewpoint: "I'm Starting to Like Java Studio Creator..."

Studio Creator focuses on development tasks

I am really coming around to Java Studio Creator. I spoke with Jim Inscore from Sun today about it, after detailing my initial impressions on it, and we spent some time discussing the product, its positioning, and its future role.

For one thing, he never called it "Rave," that I remember. I like the name "Rave;" it's distinctive, it has a certain panache. That said, it's only a code name for Sun, and lacks Sun's typical vanilla naming, so we have "Creator," instead.

We talked about where Studio Creator fits in the developer landscape. Sun places Studio Creator squarely in the corporate developer's arena. To understand this, he said that one of the most common development tasks in Java yielded a small, one-off, pragmatic web application - not an n-tiered, scalable monster enterprise application. Developers who create things like this don't spend a lot of time mastering Struts, or EJB, or much of the other J2EE APIs. They're looking at pragmatism in programming, more than structural elegance - just "get it done," rather than "do it correctly." They're the rank and file. (If you're one of these people, don't take it as an insult - you're where the tire hits the road for Java.) The API isn't important, here: the task is. Using available resources is more important than making resources available.

Contrast that group with the more technical set - the technologists and the architects. Both of these groups tend to focus on the APIs, where doing it correctly is more important than timeliness. These people will be more of the ISO crowd, the elitists and eggheads. These groups would rather write a framework, or use an acronym API, than just talk to a database and render via JSP. While these groups will (usually) yield a more scalable application, it typically takes much longer simply because they spend more time on infrastructure than application.

The latter groups want an IDE like JBuilder, Eclipse, IDEA, or NetBeans; something that helps them write code. The corporate developers tend not to care about code; they want something that helps them write applications. If they can get away with writing absolutely no code, that's fine. (Yes, I know, I'm generalizing. Many corporate developers enjoy writing code, and some technologists would rather stay away from it.)

Studio Creator is aimed squarely at the corporate developer, meaning that it's got the primary goal of enabling component reuse, whether it's a JSF component or a web service. Pre-packaged elements are king, here; think about the impact component development had for Visual Basic. This is something Java has been looking for for a long time, and I think it's finally coming around, with a product geared for component inclusion (JSF), and an IDE designed from the ground up to use component-based development.

JSF is still in its infancy, to be sure. I've not been circumspect with my own doubts about the technology, which I feel would be far too easy to abuse. However, most infants grow over time, hopefully into functioning adults; JSF's lifecycle surely has the same potential. As a new technology, its pitfalls are still being discovered and it's certainly improving.

Studio Creator actually helps that along, by encouraging usage of JSF in ways that don't expose its weaknesses. Because it still gives developers the ability to see raw code, it also allows coders to use every feature JSF provides, which will help JSF itself improve.

Creator, too, is still new. I found a lot of small things that didn't seem intuitive: absolute positioning on the pages, package structures seem underexposed, and the snippets feature looked like a bit of an afterthought. More critically, Studio Creator feels limiting. I'm personally comfortable with leveraging the J2EE stack, and Studio Creator, with its drag-and-drop approach, seems to discourage me from really working with projects in the ways I'm familiar with.

That's all right. Mr. Inscore pointed out that Studio Creator is only in pre-release, and he detailed some features that they wanted in future releases, such as being able to create rich desktop applications and mobile applications, leveraging EJB components, publication of web services (as opposed to simply using existing services) and others. As far as my personal preferences working with Studio Creator is concerned, there are a few reasons that my response is appropriate as well. I tend to fall outside the target market for Studio Creator, and even so, I find that I might end up relying on it for more pragmatic projects - because, psychologically speaking, having choices tends to be empowering, but having an incredible array of choices is actually a source of frustration. (See The Tyranny of Choice, by Barry Schwartz, published in Scientific American, April 2004 issue.) From that vantage, Studio Creator - by providing a straight line implementation choice instead of leaving the developer to decide whether to use Velocity, FreeMarker, JSP, or Cocoon... with Struts, Tapestry, WebWork, or raw servlets... with EJB, JDO, Hibernate... and let's not forget the array of testing possibilities.

Altogether, Studio Creator is workable. It's not good yet, but its prerelease status makes that acceptable. Furthermore, Sun is expecting it to help supercharge the reusable component market that the Java community hasn't quite leveraged yet, if only by focusing attention on the components instead of the tools that use them. It's a very focused product, and in my opinion, it's focused well. I'm looking forward to final releases, as well as the competition other vendors offer it.

More Stories By Joseph Ottinger

I am a software evangelist for GigaSpaces technologies, as well as a writer and musician. I've been the editor-in-chief of Java Developer's Journal and TheServerSide.

GigaSpaces Technologies is a leading provider of a new generation of application platforms for Java and .Net environments that offer an alternative to traditional application-servers. The company's eXtreme Application Platform (XAP) is a high-end application server, designed to meet the most demanding business requirements in a cost-effective manner. It is the only product that provides a complete middleware solution on a single, scalable platform. XAP is trusted by Fortune 100 companies, which leverage it as a strategic solution that enhances efficiency and agility across the IT organization.

Comments (4)

Share your thoughts on this story.

Add your comment
You must be signed in to add a comment. Sign-in | Register

In accordance with our Comment Policy, we encourage comments that are on topic, relevant and to-the-point. We will remove comments that include profanity, personal attacks, racial slurs, threats of violence, or other inappropriate material that violates our Terms and Conditions, and will block users who make repeated violations. We ask all readers to expect diversity of opinion and to treat one another with dignity and respect.


IoT & Smart Cities Stories
New competitors, disruptive technologies, and growing expectations are pushing every business to both adopt and deliver new digital services. This ‘Digital Transformation’ demands rapid delivery and continuous iteration of new competitive services via multiple channels, which in turn demands new service delivery techniques – including DevOps. In this power panel at @DevOpsSummit 20th Cloud Expo, moderated by DevOps Conference Co-Chair Andi Mann, panelists examined how DevOps helps to meet the de...
According to Forrester Research, every business will become either a digital predator or digital prey by 2020. To avoid demise, organizations must rapidly create new sources of value in their end-to-end customer experiences. True digital predators also must break down information and process silos and extend digital transformation initiatives to empower employees with the digital resources needed to win, serve, and retain customers.
In his keynote at 18th Cloud Expo, Andrew Keys, Co-Founder of ConsenSys Enterprise, will provide an overview of the evolution of the Internet and the Database and the future of their combination – the Blockchain. Andrew Keys is Co-Founder of ConsenSys Enterprise. He comes to ConsenSys Enterprise with capital markets, technology and entrepreneurial experience. Previously, he worked for UBS investment bank in equities analysis. Later, he was responsible for the creation and distribution of life ...
Smart Cities are here to stay, but for their promise to be delivered, the data they produce must not be put in new siloes. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Mathias Herberts, Co-founder and CTO of Cityzen Data, discussed the best practices that will ensure a successful smart city journey.
"Space Monkey by Vivent Smart Home is a product that is a distributed cloud-based edge storage network. Vivent Smart Home, our parent company, is a smart home provider that places a lot of hard drives across homes in North America," explained JT Olds, Director of Engineering, and Brandon Crowfeather, Product Manager, at Vivint Smart Home, in this SYS-CON.tv interview at @ThingsExpo, held Oct 31 – Nov 2, 2017, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA.
LogRocket helps product teams develop better experiences for users by recording videos of user sessions with logs and network data. It identifies UX problems and reveals the root cause of every bug. LogRocket presents impactful errors on a website, and how to reproduce it. With LogRocket, users can replay problems.
@CloudEXPO and @ExpoDX, two of the most influential technology events in the world, have hosted hundreds of sponsors and exhibitors since our launch 10 years ago. @CloudEXPO and @ExpoDX New York and Silicon Valley provide a full year of face-to-face marketing opportunities for your company. Each sponsorship and exhibit package comes with pre and post-show marketing programs. By sponsoring and exhibiting in New York and Silicon Valley, you reach a full complement of decision makers and buyers in ...
There are many examples of disruption in consumer space – Uber disrupting the cab industry, Airbnb disrupting the hospitality industry and so on; but have you wondered who is disrupting support and operations? AISERA helps make businesses and customers successful by offering consumer-like user experience for support and operations. We have built the world’s first AI-driven IT / HR / Cloud / Customer Support and Operations solution.
Data Theorem is a leading provider of modern application security. Its core mission is to analyze and secure any modern application anytime, anywhere. The Data Theorem Analyzer Engine continuously scans APIs and mobile applications in search of security flaws and data privacy gaps. Data Theorem products help organizations build safer applications that maximize data security and brand protection. The company has detected more than 300 million application eavesdropping incidents and currently secu...
Rafay enables developers to automate the distribution, operations, cross-region scaling and lifecycle management of containerized microservices across public and private clouds, and service provider networks. Rafay's platform is built around foundational elements that together deliver an optimal abstraction layer across disparate infrastructure, making it easy for developers to scale and operate applications across any number of locations or regions. Consumed as a service, Rafay's platform elimi...