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How to Tell a Twitter Story: The Art of the 140-Character Twittecdote

Has this geek invention ironically created a new form of literature?

A challenge for many who are new to Twitter is knowing what to say, how to say it, and how often to say it. But many have discovered that the 140-character limitation--even less when you are replying to someone--focuses the mind wonderfully, resulting in a new precision and elegance in their writing. Has Twitter, a classic geek invention, unwittingly spawned a new form of literature?

I know I'm not the first person to think of this, and that I won't be the best writer to create in this form. But, hopeless idealist and all-around good guy that I am, I present my first three twittecdotes for your perusal and inspiration. The stories all involve my brushes with famous people, aka namedropping. Enjoy!

-- Ballmer keynotes our gig. Arrives green room with secs to spare. Says "hi," then "excuse me." Cuts huge fart. Says "sorry." Then presents.

-- Entered Bill's house, first one, not the palace. It was 87, he was worth only a billion. Mitch Kapor was in a fierce fake argument with him

-- Met Captain Kangaroo in 1991. He was older and so was I. Grouchy Irish guy. He was on PBS then, and pitched me for money.

Follow the author at www.twitter.com/strukhoff

More Stories By Roger Strukhoff

Roger Strukhoff (@IoT2040) is Executive Director of the Tau Institute for Global ICT Research, with offices in Illinois and Manila. He is Conference Chair of @CloudExpo & @ThingsExpo, and Editor of SYS-CON Media's CloudComputing BigData & IoT Journals. He holds a BA from Knox College & conducted MBA studies at CSU-East Bay.